Girl Out of Water by Laura Silverman (eARC Review)

Publishing: May 1, 2017
Publisher
: Sourcebooks Fire
Page Count
: 320

**I was provided with an eARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!**

I found out about this book through rather unfortunate events occurring in fall/winter last year when some Neo-Nazis decided to troll Laura Silverman for absolutely no reason at all and started to give her book 1-star-ratings on Goodreads. As terrible as those events were, I was glad to see the book community rally together for her and I am also very glad that it lead me to discover Girl Out of Water for myself.

This is the perfect summer read, even when it’s not summer. Silverman has a way of just really making you feel like you are right there with the character. I could almost smell the salt of the ocean breeze or feel the sweat of the Nebraska heat without ever thinking that there was too much description. So, even when I didn’t agree with every choice Anise made, I was with her in the moment no matter what. Anise is definitely a flawed person, but I could understand her and even relate in most moments. While I am in no way as athletic as her, I get the level of passion she has towards surfing. And while I do not have this close knit group of friends in my current geographical location, I went through similar difficulties with having to adjust to the distance between me and people I cared about more than once in my life. She makes mistakes, but you know that she is never intentionally out to hurt anyone.

I think one of the things I appreciated most about this book was how much it was about family, the one you are born into and the one you choose for yourself. It’s a theme I am often missing in my YA books, because whether parents or other family members are there for us or not, they always shape us and our youth. So, to see the struggle and the love that both come with this topic just made my heart sing. And it’s not like there wasn’t still room for other things, such as the really amazing love interest. Lincoln totally won me over with his self-confidence, charm and genuine interest and care for the people around him. And yes, also his dimple!

I didn’t mind the swearing and the underage drinking in this one, but if I could have changed something it would have rather been Anise’s storyline with her mother and her final confrontation with her friends when she got back home. Somehow I felt like there was more build up and nerves from Anise compared to the easy way it was finally resolved. That is such a minor thing though, I still adored this book and would definitely recommend it as a book to pick up this summer.

Fazit: 4.5/5 stars! Great book about family, friendship, passion and finding to oneself!

Are you going to read Girl Out of Water? Have you heard about it?

Stealing Candy by Stewart Lewis (eARC Review)

Publishing: May 1, 2017
Publisher
: Sourcebooks Fire
Page Count
: 288

**I was provided with an eARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!**

When I first read the blurb, I was quite excited about the sound of Stealing Candy but unfortunately it didn’t hold up to my expectations. Candy is quite the self-centered person. From the first page on, I got a vibe from her like she thought she was better than everyone else and also that she didn’t appreciate what and who she had in her life. All she wanted was to get away from everything, but when her wish comes true, it’s not at all what she wanted … or is it?

To be kidnapped is, I imagine, a very terrifying thing to experience. Candy was scared all of two seconds, but then she was sort of happy? That’s just something that did not go into my head. She had absolutely no feeling for how much danger she was truly in and she basically regarded the whole situation as a fun adventure. All I wanted to know then was “How?!”. In addition to that, she got a closer look at one of her abductors and decided he is hot? I understand how you might hold on to the person that is treating you well in a traumatic situation like this, instead of the other guy, who beat and threatened her. Nonetheless, I would have expected her trust in him to grow over time and not for her to ponder how dreamy he looks and just be okay with how they met and his intentions for their journey. There was just no build up of them getting closer, but rather this immediate attraction, which I found odd considering the circumstances.

There were some interesting elements to this, such as the reason why Levon kidnapped her and how Candy’s famous dad played into all of it. It added mystery to it somehow. The pacing was alright too, albeit a little repetitive in terms of how they progressed on the road.

At the end, there is a change in Candy’s attitude. She opens up to people and accepts them just like she wants to be accepted, but the change was too sudden for me. I couldn’t comprehend where it was coming from exactly, it felt more like she just had to do that to come across as a better person in the end. Speaking of the end, I didn’t mind that it was quite open in terms of the romance. It seemed to be more about where Candy was in life than where she was with her relationship with Levon and I appreciated that.

Fazit: 2.5/5 stars! A difficult protagonist made it hard to relate to what was going on and why she was feeling certain ways.

Have you read any good kidnapping books that weren’t too much like thrillers? Tell me all about it!

#CurrentlyWatching: Class

My love for Doctor Who is no secret and if you’ve known me for a while, you are probably also aware of my adoration for its spin-off series Class! The show premiered in October last year in the UK, however, there is a reason why I chose to talk about it just now. Despite having been really well-received (from what I heard at least), the show just started on BBC America now. The first episode aired last week and from now on it airs every Saturday after the new Season 10 episodes of Doctor Who. The fate of its future and a possible Season 2 (which I NEED) now depends on the American ratings. I am really unhappy with that, because why on earth does it depend on US ratings now to renew a perfectly British show, but whatever. This post is a plea for you to watch it and ensure that Class definitely gets another season!

I want to start off by saying that a lot of small references or certain villains will probably make more sense if you have watched Doctor Who, but it is not strictly necessary to have watched the “parent show” beforehand. The Doctor makes a short appearance in the first episode, but thus far that’s all in terms of crossovers.

The students of Coal Hill Academy once more have to deal with extra-terrestrial threats and the stressful fact of being a teenager at the same time.

Class was created and written by Patrick Ness, a name you will probably have heard in the world of YA books before. I’ve only reviewed one of his books, which you can read here, but when I got news that he would be involved I was excited from the start. Class is a fast-paced show, yet it still manages to get you utterly invested in the fate of everyone. There are so many reasons why I love the show and it’s difficult to wrap my head around where I should even start. So, I am going to do this old-school and make a list:

  • A super diverse cast: We have POCs and people of different nationalities as main characters, we get to see different religions, disabled characters who are not defined by their disability and a canon gay relationship established in the first episode. There’s not just inter-racial but actual inter-species love because of our cinnamon roll alien prince, Charlie. Doesn’t that all sound swoonworthy amazing already?
  • Girls and boys can be friends – and JUST friends at that! The relationship between Ram and Tanya was one of my favourites, because they were so close but it never crossed over in the romantic world. It’s sad how rare that is on TV.
  • Boys get to be vulnerable and girls get to be badass. (I think this is self explanatory. Yay for defying stereotypes!)
  • Family matters! All too often when the teens get to go on adventures, the parents are just sort of … I don’t know, forgotten? Here the parents don’t hinder the action, but they worry and fret for their children. Their presence is at least always there in the back of your mind.
  • It tackles heavy topics with grace, such as homophobia, grief and complex moral questions.
  • Not one character is ignored. They each get their time to shine and it’s so worth it, because there is not a single character I don’t like. The relationships and the group dynamic is just amazing. While the romantic ships feel a bit rushed sometimes, due to the fast pace in general, I never once doubted the friendship and closeness. It just really fits the tone of the show.
  • Pop culture references! Wohooo!
  • Best one-liners on TV! *cough* I don’t like knives *cough*
  • Actually scary villains and a surprise return of an old foe in the end.

See, I am just in love with that show! Please, please tell me what’s not to like about it? I am waiting! Because here I am sitting and just enjoying it all and really hoping that I will get to see more of all those fantastic people. So, go and get caught up on that episode from last week and then tune in live or via the BBC America website for the rest of the season.

Class definitely felt a lot more adult to me than Doctor Who sometimes does. This is not exactly a show for kids, but Patrick Ness himself said that if you are into YA books and can deal with what’s going on there, you will be able to handle the show as well. There’s a LOT more blood and naked skin than in Doctor Who for sure.

Did you watch Class? Are you hoping for another season as much as I do?

Geekerella by Ashley Poston (eArc Review)

Publishing: April 4, 2017
Publisher
: Quirk Books
Page Count
: 320

**I was provided with an eArc from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!**

I don’t know if you know this about me, but I am a huge fan of the Cinderella Story movies. The first one is one of my all time favourite chick flicks. Also, I am a massive geek. My ability to annoy people with the same topic (mostly a TV show/movie/actor/actress I can’t stop thinking about) is one of my best developed skills. That very same thing is also the reason I wasn’t very popular at school. Everything pop culture was always my jam, but unfortunately my fellow peers got very bored with my ramblings after a while. No one was ever truly mean to me, they all thought I was a nice girl, but we all know that “nice” can be an insult as well. It took me forever to come to terms with who I was and that I was awesome in my own right, I just had to find the right people to make my true geek-colors shine. This book just embodied all of that for me – that journey, the finding to one self, the friendships that can be found in fandoms and to be brave enough to stand up for what you believe in.

Elle is such a relatable girl to me. She’s passionate about a TV show, even if it hasn’t been on air for years, and she’s a blogger (SHE’S ONE OF US!). Generally she seemed like a good person and she didn’t deserve the treatment from her stepmonster/-sister. All she wanted was to cherish the memories of her parents and she wasn’t even allowed to do that. There were so many moments that made me really emotional. I was so glad when she finally stood up for herself, because she was so isolated and there’s only so much a person can take. I don’t know why I ever keep hoping for better reactions from the villains, but I guess I just don’t want to give up hope on them. Anyway, I was so happy when she found a great friend and unexpected allies along the way. Go Elle!

Darien was such a sweetheart even when he could be a silly dork sometimes. I liked that he was one of the biggest up and coming stars, but felt so utterly grounded most of the time. He just wanted to be a teenager and I think, he too, still needed to figure himself out (because sometimes he was acting immature). He is of Indian descent, but I didn’t feel like he was anywhere near as connected to that culture as he was to geekdom. Just like Elle, he struggled with his sense of family and I liked the idea of sometimes choosing your own family in the people you surround yourself with.

Everything just fit together perfectly in this book! The atmosphere felt authentically fangirlish and it was fun to have settings such as a convention and a movie set (although, as a film student, I know better than to believe that a big budget movie can be shot in 23 days. It takes 4-6 weeks minimum). The only reason that this isn’t a 5-star-book for me is because I found everything a bit predictable. It’s fairy tale re-telling, so that was to be expected and it didn’t take away anything from my enjoyment of the story. However, I also didn’t feel like it was something completely groundbreaking, so yeah, that’s why. I would still highly recommend it!

Fazit: 4/5 stars! Lovely and fun geekish retelling!

Would you read this book? Do you think Geekerella will warm your heart as it did mine?