Admission by Julie Buxbaum (eARC Review)

Publisher: Random House Children’s Books/Delacorte Press
Page Count
: 352
Release Date: December 1, 2020

*I was provided with an eARC by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!*

I have not read any book by Julie Buxbaum before, but know a couple of friends who quite enjoy her style and I was excited to check out Admission. As far as I gathered, this story was inspired by the very much real admission scandal but is an entirely fictitious version of similar events. Neither research nor any association with real people exists and since the author makes a point of mentioning that very clearly, I thought I should too.

Julie Buxbaum did not choose an easy topic, that much was obvious from the get go to me. You have this family steeped in privilege and while you do want to allow the reader to connect to the characters, you don’t want to redeem them or excuse their actions. I am not quite sure how, but Buxbaum managed this balancing act phenomenally.

With an alternating Now and Then POV, you get to explore the events that led up to Chloe’s life and that of her family imploding, while at the same time seeing the very concrete fallout from it. I didn’t really wonder whether Chloe knew what was going on or not, but I enjoyed the debate on what it means to be complicit. Buxbaum managed to humanize her without sugarcoating that she is the villain in a lot of people’s stories. I feel like a lot of authors have that need to not just give their characters a redemption arc, but also one that absolves them of their wrong-doing, which thankfully wasn’t done here. I don’t want to say you empathize with what happened, because I was downright disgusted by some of the conversations that family had, because screw them for their entitlement, but it made you understand how their thought process was and that weirdly made sense in turn.

I don’t think this is one of those books where you fall in love with very many characters, however, I have found great pleasure in the way friendships and family are portrayed. I liked how inconsequential the romantic love interest was, because in the end, it’s very doubtful that it would be a priority in such an extreme situation. Instead it focused on so many different kind of relationships and I especially appreciated the one between Chloe and her best friend Shola as well as the one to her sister Isla (both of which were my favourite characters if I am being completely honest).

While definitely not the easiest of topics and quite frustrating to read about sometimes, it was still a page turner I quite enjoyed. I’m glad that no excuses were made and consequences were implemented. It once again made me really, really, really glad that I did not have to deal with the stress of going to university/college in the US though.

Fazit: 4/5 stars! An intense look at how far some people go for their children and how it all blows up!

Do you want to read Admission? Do you have university admission horror stories of your own? Feel free to ask questions about the system in my country if you want to!

9 thoughts on “Admission by Julie Buxbaum (eARC Review)

  1. Man, I didn’t thinks omeone would fictionalize the scandal so fast (at least not before Law & Order: SVU did their take on it. And I’m certain they will at some point). I doubt I’ll read this, as it doesn’t look like my kind of story, but I’m glad it approaches the topic in a way that both keeps the gravity of what the characters did in mind but doesn’t utterly demonize them.

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  2. Fair play, Buxbaum was quick in getting a book out so quickly on this subject and I’m glad to see that she did a good job at humanising the characters without excusing their actions. I don’t I could cope with the US’s university application process. Sounds way to stressful for my liking.

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  3. I’m happy you enjoyed this one, Kat! This “I was downright disgusted by some of the conversations that family had” WAS A MOOD for me while I was reading, too. Sometimes it was just so damn frustrating it made me want to scream. I was happy to read this story though and I really liked how the author showed that privilege and didn’t romanticize or gave a happy ending to it all. My favorite part of this was the sisters relationship for sure! 🙂

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