TMP – TV Edition: Space/Aliens

I just want to preface this by saying that there’s another post about what I’ve been watching coming your way as well today. AND I also wanted to say that all my rankings for 2020 (be it film, TV or books) will be posted in the upcoming days. So, loads of posts ahead – I hope you won’t get tired of me!

As we’ve established by now, I am doing the Thursday Movie Picks feature. This series is hosted by Wandering through the Shelves and offers you a weekly prompt to post some movie recommendations/talking points according to the theme. Usually, you are supposed to post about 3-5 examples, which I find a very manageable amount.

The thing is, to keep the lists spicy and interesting, there’s sometimes exceptions to the theme where we get to venture into the land of TV. You all know that it’s more my strong suite than movies, so I am excited to talk about aliens and space today!

Lost in Space

This show will soon go into its third and final season and I have enjoyed following the lives of the Robinson family so much. The visual effects are top notch and the characters will all grow on you so much. I haven’t seen the original, but dang, do I love this version.

Another Life

I am just trying to patiently wait for season 2, because I need to know how my favourite AI is doing. Otherwise, the crew can get a bit annoying … because who picked for those people to be in a tightly confined space together?? But I’d still like to know how it continues.

Roswell, New Mexico

I actually adored the original of this one, but I have come to love this version as well. It has its flaws and season 2 was all over the place (which cannot even be blamed on covid entirely). I just want Maria to be treated better and get all the happy she wants and deserves.

Steven Spielberg presents Taken

Taken is a mini-series from the early 2000s, so, bear that in mind should you want to check it out. I was OBSESSED with it as a kid and I am sure we still have the DVD box set at home somewhere. It’s this multi-generational tale of how people were abducted by aliens and how that affected the course of their lives. The aliens themselves were pretty cliché, but the families – so intriguing how everything came together.

Honorable Mentions

This is actually a “genre” or topic I quite enjoy, so, there’s loads and loads of shows I love to watch. Here are some other examples that I enjoyed but that I didn’t want to go into detail with, because I do have a problem with keeping these posts short.

  • Roswell (the OG version)
  • Dark Matter
  • Killjoys
  • Doctor Who
  • Torchwood
  • Firefly
  • Steven Universe

What did you think of my picks this week? What are some of your favourite space/alien-themed shows? Let’s chat!

This Is Not a Ghost Story by Andrea Portes (Book Review)

Publisher: HarperTeen
Page Count
: 288

CW: suicidal ideation, depression, mental health decline, grief

When I hear the phrase “this is not a ghost story”, my mind immediately goes to the latest installment of the Haunting series – Bly Manor. So, it came as no surprise when this book was recommended to me as the perfect complimentary read. However, once I started I more and more got Hill House vibes from it (a menacing house working against you, rapidly declining mental health). Then again, it doesn’t seem like either one and yet would fit into the series really well … that is, if you were focusing on just one 17-year-old girl instead of a large ensemble cast. But I digress.

This Is Not a Ghost Story is written in a stream of consciousness/inner monologue style that immediately made Daffodil (the main character and our narrator) endearing to me. She is chaotic, daydreaming, binges conspiracy theory documentaries on Netflix all day and manages to not move from her bed unless strictly necessary. Human contact? Who needs that!?
While I adored her voice, because it helped lighten some of the creepier scenes with a tinge of humour, I could also see a couple people struggling with it. The way I see it is that it’s one of those things that’s either totally your thing or not at all.

As you all well know, I don’t really do horror. OR I mostly only do horror light, so, this worked really well for me. The title already says it, it is not a ghost story. It sure feels like one at times, but there’s a lot more to it that just keeps unraveling and tricking you. This book is for all the people who hear a creepy noise and deliberately ignore it until no longer possible. It’s for all of us who will try to explain away the most illogical and impossible things like there is any kind of rationale to it.

The only thing I am kind of grapple with is the end. It’s not that it doesn’t make sense. It really does, but I am not sure if it feels right? Some have described it as lackluster, which isn’t even my issue with it. I am just uncertain about the involvement of a certain someone in getting Daffodil into this situation in the first place. It just does not sit right with me entirely, but maybe … maybe that is just not for me to understand. As Daffodil said, there’s not yet words for some things you want to say.

In the end, I did pick up a horror-esque book on purpose and … I enjoyed myself! A LOT! I have really ventured out of my comfort zone a little bit this year and I am really proud of that. Maybe this book isn’t perfect, but I am basing this rating on how much it entertained me and I more or less inhaled This Is Not a Ghost Story.

Fazit: 4.5/5 stars! Still trying to come to terms with the ending, but overall I really enjoyed this!


What are we thinking? Would you pick up this book? Let’s talk in the comments!

Beartown by Fredrik Backman (Book Review)

Publisher: Washington Square Press
Page Count
: 415

CW: rape, physical assault, racism, homophobia, substance abuse, suicidal ideation

I’ve wanted to read Beartown for the longest time. Many people I know have read and liked it, but I especially keep thinking of my good friend Lois @My Midnight Musing when I think about the book. She, too, encouraged me to pick it up and it’s not even like I didn’t want to. I really did! I was just also extremely scared. Somehow I just knew that once I would start reading it, this would become one of my all time favourite books and … I was not mistaken, but it was also so incredibly emotional.

“One of the plainest truths about both towns and individuals is that they usually don’t turn into what we tell them to be, but what they are told they are.”

Backman talks about Beartown and makes it seem like it could be in pretty much any country (although it’s set in Sweden). He has a talent in taking this small community in the middle of nowhere that has no other topic than hockey to talk about and make it seem like the most relatable town there is. They are tight-knit yet judgmental, they are proud but also so very hopeful for a better future, they are hard-working to the point of breaking … they are full of shame and guilt.

“Difficult questions, simple answers. What is a community?
It is the sum total of our choices.”

For a town that likes difficult questions and simple answers, I feel like the book gives the reader the exact opposite experience. It asks seemingingly simple questions about sports, community, parenthood, culpability, friendship, family and love. You, for yourself, might even have very clear answers on what those things mean to you, but Backman makes sure you see all the angles. You might not always agree, but it sure will make you think.

There is a relief in finding a character at the beginning of a story, latching on to them and finding out that they truly are the shining light you hoped them to be. In the grand scheme of things, the adults are definitely far worse than the kids/teens, but there were still some incomprehensible choices made all around. With so many disappointments and resentment building towards certain people in this story, I was so appreciative of the ones that did the right thing over and over again, no matter how hard or impossible it seemed. I even developed a certain pride for people as if they were my own children/siblings/loved ones.

“If you are honest, people may deceive you. Be honest anyway. If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfishness. Be kind anyway. All the good you do today will be forgotten by others tomorrow. Do good anyway.”

I don’t want to go into detail about what happens in the novel. The foreshadowing, and I am not sure you can really call it that, since it’s so very blatant and in your face, is cruel. Your heart picks up pace every time you turn the page wondering when the inevitable destructive act will take place. Not one moment goes by where you don’t know that happiness is fleeting and soon these lives will crumble to pieces. You are just not certain if they will be able to rebuild it all.
At the end, you might ask yourself if justice was dealt, but things will never be the same for the characters either way. I think our actual real life justice system fails people over and over all the time. People make victims out of predators and treat others less humane depending on their value to the community. It’s heartbreaking in a way you want to do nothing but sob for days, but it’s also realistic. You cannot always sugarcoat reality. We, as humanity, still have so much farther to go and I enjoyed how Backman lit the situations from so many different angles. Although my answer is clear. No, there was no real justice.

Fazit: 5/5 stars! I think this one will stick with me for a long while.


Have you read Beartown? Would you like to? Have you read any of the other novels Fredrik Backman has written? Let’s chat!

Thursday Movie Picks – Holiday Action Movies

Merry Christmas and happy holidays everyone! I don’t know if you celebrate, but where I live, we celebrate Christmas on the 24th, which means I totally thought ahead and scheduled this post! Yay me!

As we’ve established by now, I am doing the Thursday Movie Picks feature. This series is hosted by Wandering through the Shelves and offers you a weekly prompt to post some movie recommendations/talking points according to the theme. Usually, you are supposed to post about 3-5 examples, which I find a very manageable amount.

Today’s theme is Holiday Action movies, which is not my forte at all. But I shall try my best!

Die Hard

I could not not mention it. It’s like THE classic action Christmas movie, because it’s set during Christmas AND has loads of action. Do I really need to say more?

Shazam!

Is a superhero movie automatically an action movie? I don’t know, but I am counting it towards that goal. There’s a winter carnival and everything, helping get some general themes across.

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

I loved this movie so much when I was younger. I completely forgot it was set during Christmas time, even though there’s several holiday parties and a toy store robbery and Michelle Monaghan in a sexy Mrs Santa outfit, but a little research brought back the memory.


Obviously there weren’t as many picks as I usually am able to present. Do you have some notable holiday action movies? I don’t think we were limited to Christmas, although that’s mostly what I went for.

Naughty or Nice Tag

Was I tagged for this two years ago? Yes, I totally was. Since this is the Naughty or Nice Tag, I figured I should come clean right away … you know, as a precaution. However, I really want to thank the orang-utan librarian regardless, because I love getting tagged (even if I am perpetually late) and their blog is absolutely top notch!

The Rules

  • Tag & link the person who tagged you.
  • Tag and link Jenniely’s post, for she’s love to read everyone’s answers!
  • Tick/cross off the ones you’ve done
  • Tag another 10 people. (I am going to skip this step and just invite anyone who wants to do this to go ahead and consider themselves tagged!)

Received an ARC and not reviewed it

To start out, I want to say that I have never actually received a physical ARC. If we are taking eARCs into consideration as well though, there may have been 2-3 I didn’t end up reviewing. Look, I am not proud of it, but I didn’t enjoy them and didn’t even finish the books, which made me feel like I shouldn’t review them.

Have a less than 60% feedback rating on Netgalley

100% BABY!!!! I never thought it would happen, but I have been super diligent since I barely get approved anyway.

Rated a book on Goodreads and promised a full review was to come on your blog (and never did)

I don’t think so? Correct me if you remember that differently, but I can’t recall doing that.

Folded down a page of a book

I don’t like having my books dogeared or bent, folded, otherwise altered … but I guess I have done it at some point. No denying it unfortunately.

Accidentally spilled on a book

School books … yeah. (They were my own and not ones returned to the school after the term or anything like that). I hated it so much though.

DNF a book this year

Nope.

Bought a book purely because it was pretty with no intention of reading it

Sometimes they’re just so pretty. I want them. And then … I never read them. Maybe I intend to read them, but just don’t end up doing it …

Read whilst you were meant to be doing something else (like e.g. homework)

Oh, I have definitely done that. So sure.

Skim read a book

Again … school books … cause I could not care.

Completely missed your Goodreads goal

I once adjusted a goal … but like a month before the end of the year and not because I was missing it by  A LOT. So, I’d say that doesn’t count.

Borrowed a book and not returned it to the library

Aside from the fact that libraries aren’t my biggest friends in my country because they have none of the books I want, I think the last time I borrowed something was in elementary school. They would not have let it slide if I hadn’t returned that.

Broke a book buying ban

Probably?

Started a review, left it for ages then forgot what the book was about

I don’t remember what book exactly that would have been about, but I am so sure it happened at some point. Although … I probably never started the review to begin with, I just put off writing it in general until I forgot.

Wrote in a book you were reading

I have books where you’re SUPPOSED to write in them. So … I have! AND I was meant to do that!

Finished a book and not added it to your Goodreads 

If so, not on purpose and not that I can remember.

Borrowed a book and not returned it to a friend

Since I would never want anyone to do that to me, I would never not return a book. NEVER.

Dodged someone asking if they could borrow a book

I know that I like my books way more pristine looking than the majority and if you want to have your book look well-read, that’s totally cool. But I want mine looking like they’re fresh off the press. And since a friend once had the contents of basically an entire pool dumped on a book she was borrowing from me and then tried to give it back to me like it was no big deal … I tend to avoid that stuff.

Broke the spine of someone else’s book

I would NEVER!

Took the jacket off a book to protect it and ended up making it more damaged

No?

Sat on a book accidentally

Definitely. But nothing happened. No books were harmed in the process.


As mentioned above, if YOU want to do this tag – consider yourself tagged!!! What did you think of my answers? Could you relate?

This Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar/Max Gladstone (Book Review)

Publisher: Saga Press
Page Count
: 209

I went into this book pretty naive. I thought that if I could grasp movies like Inception (not that it thematically has anything to do with this particular book, I was more thinking in terms of complexity), I’d surely be able to understand This Is How You Lose the Time War. Oh, how foolish a thought of mine!

From the get go, you get plunged into a world or multiple complex interweaving time strings you are not going to be able to comprehend. There is no explanation of this universe. There is no easing you into the matter of Red and Blue (the main characters who tell the stories, partly through letters but also just as you follow their path) and their unique rivalry turned deep connection. You just have to accept prompts such as:

Burn before reading.
Bubble to read.
Every seed is a letter.

When you start out, none of this makes sense. How do you burn a letter and THEN read it? But you soon come to accept that there are words on the page you know, that are familiar, but that don’t make sense in this constellation or context to you. It’s a process that took some time for me to come to terms with and just read like I understood what was going on. But then, Red and Blue aren’t “normal” people/humans. You cannot expect them to operate the way you would and to be confined to our meager options. They are agents of the Garden and the Agency respectively and that means something entirely new and complex again.

But as you go on, dive deeper, it doesn’t have to all seem logical to you. Maybe there is no universal logic that will ever be able to be applied to this novella and that is okay too. It works in its own unique way. I can see a lot of people struggling with it though and it is something to be aware of when you pick up This Is How You Lose the Time War.

What “saved” this book is the sapphic longing that oozed off the pages. It was beautiful and gave this confusing mess a purpose. There is really no other way to put it.

“I love you. I love you. I love you. I’ll write it in waves. In skies. In my heart. You’ll never see, but you will know. I’ll be all the poets, I’ll kill them all and take each one’s place in turn, and every time love’s written in all the strands it will be to you.”

Fazit: 3/5 stars! It makes more sense towards the end, but it’s still utterly confusing in its lyrical beauty.

What is the last read that had you all confused? How important is worldbuilding to you when the focus of the story lies on emotions? Let’s talk!

Thursday Movie Picks: Movies by Female Directors

As we’ve established by now, I am doing the Thursday Movie Picks feature. This series is hosted by Wandering through the Shelves and offers you a weekly prompt to post some movie recommendations/talking points according to the theme. Usually, you are supposed to post about 3-5 examples, which I find a very manageable amount.

Today’s theme is movies directed by female directors! In general, I adore that as an idea, because why not celebrate the women who make amazing content? I was just struggling to decide whether to give in to the idea that women make great romance movies (cause they do) or to focus on other genres as well. I hope I made a decent mix of things, but also … I like certain genres more and watch more along the lines of romance, comedy or family drama. And, I really focused on recent releases, because I like new things.

The Broken Hearts Gallery – Natalie Krinsky

There’s so many bad romantic comedies every year that I cherish the good ones like nothing else. This may have replaced Set It Up as my favourite RomCom and that means a lot!

The Half of It – Alice Wu

This movie was so good! The cinematography is top notch and the meaning behind the imagery and its symbolism is worthy of an entire thesis if you ask me.

Late Night/The High Note – Nisha Ganatra

You get a two for one here! Both of these movies focus on strong women in their respective fields of work. It’s about lifting up a future generation and has sweet romance notes without being the focus at all. I enjoyed them both a lot.

Little Women – Greta Gerwig

I just love this movie. I will always love this movie. I know I only mentioned it a couple posts ago, but I could probably find a way to mention Little Women in every single post if I tried.

The Party’s Just Beginning – Karen Gillan

This was Karen Gillan’s first feature length directing effort and a very personal story set in Scotland. It’s definitely to be watched with caution, because it leaves you in a very sad state of mind. Trigger warnings for suicide and depression are necessary, but it was still an amazing movie.

The Old Guard – Gina Prince-Bythewood

Gine Prince-Bythewood is not new to the scene, having directed gems such as Love & Basketball or Beyond the Lights (which I can also 100% recommend). But it’s still more on the rare side that women get to direct action movies, so, I wanted to mention The Old Guard. While I will agree that it’s a character-driven movie on the slow-paced side, which also feels a bit like a prequel set-up for a franchise, I really, really enjoyed it.


Yeah … I couldn’t hold back today. I hope you won’t mind that there are a couple more film picks this week! What are some of your favourite movies directed by women?

The End of the Year Book Tag – 2020

Can you believe we are at the stage of the year where tags like this make sense? I saw the End of the Year Book Tag over at Sofii’s A Book. A Thought. blog and she was happy to let me steal it. I know I am nowhere near my reading numbers from a couple years ago, but I am actually pretty content with what I managed to get to in 2020. Let’s see what the questions hold!

Are there any books you started this year that you need to finish?

Beartown (Beartown, #1)     This Is How You Lose the Time War

I am currently reading Beartown (which I started in October but got busy and wanted to give more attention to) and This Is How You Lose the Time War (which is utterly confusing). Realistically, I think I can finish both of them, I just have to be willing to make the time now.

Do you have an autumnal (Spring) book to transition into the end of the year?

Take a Hint, Dani Brown (The Brown Sisters, #2)

I have to say that I don’t really plan ahead my reading like that, or go for certain seasonal themes. I could see how people would like something more colourful for winter or so on, but I can’t say I’ve been looking into that. However, I still have Take a Hint, Dani Brown ready on my kindle, which is sure to warm my heart!

Is there a new release you’re still waiting for?

Admission

First of all, I am not super aware of when books release these days. Secondly, I think most of the books I was curious about already released. For example Admission by Julie Buxbaum. I quite enjoyed that one and it got published at the beginning of the month!

What are three books you want to read before the end of the year?

This Is Not a Ghost Story Soulswift Normal People: The Scripts

Aside from the ones I mentioned above, I am not sure how much I will actually be able to manage. I mean … there’s like two weeks left of the year and I don’t think I have it in me to read five books in total. However, IF I miraculously make it, the ones mentioned above are on my priority list.
This is Not a Ghost Story was recommended to people who enjoyed the Haunting of Bly Manor and I don’t know in what aspect it will be like the show, but I was too curious not to check it out. Also, it has a stunning cover, isn’t too long and ties into me wanting to get out of my reading comfort zone more.
Soulswift is along the lines of theological-esque fantasy and I am very much into that.
Normal People: The Scripts is like the Fleabag scripts aka it is a hardcover copy of all the scripts from the show. I love-hated the regular book in a weird way, but I am still 100% obsessed with it, so, I figured it would be a great addition to my library.

Is there a book you think could still shock you and become your favourite of the year?

There’s obviously no way to know for sure, but Beartown ticks all the boxes to become a favourite! It’s sports-related, has a tight-knit small town community, drama, beautiful beautiful quotes. I swear I have put so many sticky notes into that book already.

Have you already started making reading plans for 2021?

Ace of Spades

I don’t really make reading plans as much. I do intend to up my Goodreads Challenge from 30 (which I managed well this year) to 35 books. But I also saw the tweet below and the illustration and comparison to Dair and I am really into the idea of reading Ace of Spades next year!


I hope you enjoyed this! I have found myself liking tags that aren’t too long as of late, so I hope you liked reading it too. Let me know some of your thoughts on the tag or feel free to steal it yourself!

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab (Book Review)

Publisher: Tor Books
Page Count
: 448

I wanted to love this book and yet, I did not. It’s not fair to you to just say that and nothing more, so, I am going to try my very best to explain my conflicted feelings about the book. However, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue might be a book best explored with as little knowledge as possible beforehand, therefore proceed with caution from here on out (although I will try not to spoil anything!!).

“The old gods may be great, but they are neither kind nor merciful. They are fickle, unsteady as moonlight on water, or shadows in a storm. If you insist on calling them, take heed: be careful what you ask for, be willing to pay the price. And no matter how desperate or dire, never pray to the gods that answer after dark.”

Addie does not wish to lead the life people expect her to. In many ways I understand her and I understand just how trapped she felt. Having said that, she was also told in no uncertain terms and more than once that making a deal after dark was dangerous (as showcased with the quote above). But what does Addie do? She makes a deal regardless and then faults the darkness for the cruel terms.
I am not saying that the darkness is kind or good, but throughout the story, I often felt more inclined to side with them instead of Addie. There are rules to magic and it always, always, always comes at a costly price. So, while I felt empathetic towards the dire and heartbreaking circumstances Addie found herself in, I was not so willing to shirk her of all responsibilities here.

“The first mark she left upon the world, long before she knew the truth, that ideas are so much wilder than memories, that they long and look for ways of taking root”

Now, what does Addie do with the life ahead of her? She is unable to leave a mark in the traditional way, but there would still be a whole world to see out there. Traveling just to see different cultures and places though is not in any way a pursuit of hers. Instead she turns to artists and tries to make herself memorable through other means. She calls herself a muse and maybe that’s true, but did the artists peak because of her? Did she jumpstart their careers? The answer is maybe, but I do not really know.

One of my major issues with this book was that I did not really care until the 30% mark of the story. That is a very long time to just go on a ride with someone you are not very attached to. After that, however, Addie’s story was not just hers but also one of many others and it increased the pace immensely for me. I did not really know what Addie’s goal was, but the moment she met Henry, the story got a bit more direction.

“I remember you.” Three words, large enough to tip the world.”

Henry tipped the scales of the story. He was kind and sweet and felt the world to his core. When storms swept over him, I wanted to hold him and make him feel better. I understood why Addie would be drawn to him, regardless of the unique circumstances their encounter entailed. But those two held on to each other like they were life rafts on a stormy sea and it got too deep too fast. Still, I understood the why of it all, I just also knew this was unlikely to last forever. Strangely, their progression felt natural anyway, but it also didn’t make me feel utterly surprised at certain twists and turns.

“Because happiness is brief, and history is lasting, and in the end, everyone wants to be remembered.”

This book claimed to be in honor of all the women time had forgotten, but, despite that claim almost all the people Addie mentions through history, or at least the ones who were most noteworthy (according to her story?) weremen. I was wrecking my brain and thinking about who all Addie mentioned, but except for two women and a single sentence here and there, I just could only remember men and that irked me. Being a patron of the arts, being a part of so many historical events, there must have been more.
In general, Addie lived through so much history and yet it feels like she did not really change through it. She would certainly say she had grown less naive and that is true, but she was still stubborn to a fault. I would never fault her for doing the things she did, because they were necessary for survival, but sometimes I also felt like she made it harder than necessary on herself.

“And there in the dark, he asks if it was really worth it.
Were the instants of joy worth the stretches of sorrow?
Were the moments of beauty worth the year of pain?
And she turns her head, and looks at him, and says ‘Always.”

In the end, Schwab still knows how to weave a story. The prose is always engaging and beautiful. The ending was fantastic and in my heart, definitely 100% memorable. In that regard, the story was worth it and satisfying. But the way I found myself more drawn to Luc instead of Addie or Henry, the way I would have loved to be swallowed up by darkness and lead a life with ever changing green eyes looking back at me, I doubted my sanity a little bit. I don’t think I was always rooting for the right people and that has made me feel off about the whole thing.

On a final note … Addie is short for Adeline and throughout this whole book, I could not stop thinking of The Age of Adaline. I am very much aware that Schwab worked on this story for years and that they are not alike, but both involve more or less immortal women and bookish handsome men and … my brain would not stop going there.

Fazit: 3.5/5 stars! While I do feel Addie has imprinted herself in my memory, but it wasn’t all I had hoped for.

Have you read Addie LaRue’s story? Do you want to? What would you want to be remembered for?

Thursday Movie Picks: Movies for Seniors/The Elderly

As I have announced last week, I am now going to take part in the Thursday Movie Picks feature. This series is hosted by Wandering through the Shelves and offers you a weekly prompt to post some movie recommendations/talking points according to the theme. Usually, you are supposed to post about 3-5 examples, which I find a very manageable amount.

Today I am going to present to you some movies for seniors/the elderly! What exactly does that mean? I think it’s pretty much up to you. It does not mean that the actors/actresses in the movies have to be old … because what is old? It can just be about a decade elderly people might want to reminisce about. There’s a lot of ways to interpret this theme and I hope you enjoy the movie picks I have chosen for you!

It’s Complicated

This is one of my favourite romantic comedies of all time and I would never say that any of the cast members are old, because look at their vitality and screen presence, but you also have to admit that they are older than the average main character in that genre. I am in favour of finding love at all stages of life though!

Water for Elephants

Maybe I am still transfixed by the book, but I adored the changing POV between the present and past. I am also sure that the 30s weren’t always easy to live through, but something about that aesthetic just makes my heart sing.

Rebecca

I tried to throw in a classic, but I wanted it to be a new interpretation. I am sure many seniors know the Hitchcock version, but I would love to hear their take on this new one. I don’t think it’s groundbreaking in any shape or form, but my rose colored heart was not opposed to the more happily ever after ending they included here. Also … the cinematography is beautiful.

Kodachrome

When I think of films that might appeal to the elderly, I think of generational dramas that involve old media. Kodachrome has all that.

The Photograph

I know that there is a revival of photography on actual film rather than digitally, but similarly to the previous movie, I enjoyed the generational discourse as well as the medium a lot here. I don’t know if it’s too modern, but I also refuse to believe that the elderly will only watch movies that were made in the 50s.


What did you think of the movies I chose for this feature? Would you watch any of them with your grandparents or an elderly friend? Let’s talk!