The DUFF: Book vs. Trailer

In my Taylor Swift Book Tag I mentioned how much I was looking forward to reading the DUFF (=Designated Ugly Fat Friend) by Kody Keplinger and now I finally got around to it. As you may or may not know, I buy a lot of the books I read after watching the trailer for their movie adaptation and this one was no exception. All throughout the comments on YouTube people complained about how different the movie looked from the book. I thought this was just the usual annoyance that came with movie adaptations barely ever being faithful to their underlying material, but now I can tell you that the two are really nothing alike. I don’t know what the studio was thinking when they produced this film, but it has nothing to do with the story the book tried to tell.

So, basically the movie looks like a typical generic teenage RomCom – nothing wrong with that. Themes like the one from “She’s All That” and “Mean Gilrs” have been copied a million times for a simple reason: they work. I’m not one to judge them for that and quite honestly I would watch it for the simple reason that it has Robbie Amell in it, but that doesn’t change the fact that it’s not the book.

Warning: from here on there will be Spoilers for the book (and possibly the movie)!

The DUFF by Kody Keplinger is about Bianca Piper, a cynic girl who deals with her problems by entering into a closeted enemies-with-benefits relationship with the person she hates the most: Wesley Rush. She starts avoiding her friends and bottles up her emotions which inevitably leads to a lot of chaos. Despite what the trailer suggests, the story is a lot deeper and deals with multiple issues that not only teens are confronted with. Here are some of the major differences I’ve spotted:

  • Bianca doesn’t come to Wesley for help. She despises him and solely uses him as a means of escape, well until it turns into something else. It’s different than in the movie though. She doesn’t want to change her appearance, or herself in general, to make anyone like her and he doesn’t fall for her just because she’s slowly changing for the better, but because they have a genuine connection. Bianca knows that for the people who really care about her, she doesn’t have to pretend.
  • I have no idea who Bella Thorne is supposed to be. There is no mean girl in the story. Of course there are the obligatory bitchy cheerleaders, but not a particular mean girl who rules the school. Was that really necessary to add?
  • There is some hope in me that they will deal with the family issues of the characters in the movie, even though it doesn’t look like it from what I could tell from the trailer. But I thought it was important to have Bianca’s father’s alcoholism and her mother being away all the time as well as Wesley’s judgmental grandmother, his sweet little sister and so on in the book. The cast list doesn’t really reassure me though … we’ll see.
  • The movie makes it look like the goal of it all is to make Bianca datable for prom – she doesn’t even go to prom! Neither does she go to the Homecoming or any other school dance, because they just aren’t her thing. There better not be some big showdown at prom …
  • The Nest just doesn’t exist. Seems sad to me, since I really wanted to see Joe.
  • I suppose there will be a lot less sex in the movie. Just an educated guess.
  • I suppose the only thing that will be the same in the movie and the book is moral of the story, which means that Bianca soon discovers that everyone who has friends feels like the Duff at some point.

I hope it came across that I really don’t think the stories have anything in common. I mean not even the set up is the same. Have you read the book? Let’s talk about it!

Mummy on the Orient Express

What sounds like an Agatha Christie mystery is actually this week’s episode of Doctor Who. You know the drill; this review of “Mummy on the Orient Express” includes several Spoilers as I am laying out my thoughts. Proceed with caution!

I loved this episode from start to finish! All the references, the cameos and the whole 20’s look of it – brilliant! Visually, this episode really was another gem of this Series. In my opinion, putting the clock on screen was another smart move. But let’s not just talk about cinematography, but about the storyline as well. This episodes was supposed to serve as final farewell journey for Clara and the Doctor before they part their ways. Of course, in the end she couldn’t leave him, because just like a drug addict, she needed another shot of adventure. But let’s break it down a little more:

  • I was actually surprised to see Clara in this episode. As much as I love her, I expected the Doctor to sulk a little after their huge fight last week and to go on an adventure by himself. However, in the end I didn’t mind at all that Clara was on board, because the episode was not centered around her. I enjoyed seeing them talk about their fight and their future together. Clara’s relationship with the Doctor is so special and I am never sure how to categorize it, but not everything needs a label anyway – I just love their dynamic together. Also, I am really glad that Danny doesn’t stand in the way of Clara and the Doctor hanging out together, but I would like to actually see him tag along on one (or several) trip(s).
  • All through this season, I had the impression that the Doctor wasn’t even fazed or distressed when people died around him. It seemed like that wasn’t much different this episode, but I then was relieved to see him step up and actually put an effort into saving people. He is not heartless, well he in fact has two hearts, and I am happy about that.
  • The Mummy as a monster wasn’t the most terrible idea I’ve ever seen, but they always rush the ending so much. The creatures seem invincible and intricate most of the time and then they get defeated in a matter of seconds. Literally 66 seconds this time! I don’t want to complain too much, because this episode was mostly very well executed, but this is more of general feeling throughout the entire season so far. Please don’t keep rushing the endings!
  • I thought it was funny that all the experts, doctors and so on, looked a bit like famous dead scientists. Did I spy an Einstein?
  • Again no Missy!  With all those people dying, I thought she’d make an appearance for sure. But maybe she is behind “Gus”? Who knows …
  • Loved some of the cameos and actors. That interpretation of “Don’t Stop Me Now” by Foxes was amazing – I didn’t think I’d hear a Queen song on Doctor Who when I got up this morning. Also, Frank Skinner as Perkins was delightful and amazingly helpful to the Doctor. When he first appeared, he seemed a little creepy to me – lurking in the shadows and all – but he then redeemed himself. You should never say “No” to the Doctor though, when he asks you to tag along on the TARDIS.
  • The references were great and I was sitting on the edge of my seat waiting for them to come up. On the one hand there was the obvious one to “The Empty Child” – meaning “Are you my Mummy?” – and on the other hand there was the reference to “The Big Bang“. When the Doctor said that Gus tried to coax him into coming before, he actually referenced to the time of Amy’s and Rory’s wedding where the Doctor got a call, where it was mentioned that an Egyptian goddess was loose on the Orient Express in space. I know that a lot of people are tired of the references to Matt Smith/Eleven, but I will never be one of them.

So, I probably forgot to mention something, but if that something comes up, we can just discuss it in the comments. “Flatline” looks like another potentially creepy episode. As always, I’m already looking forward to more next week. Read you soon!