Ms. Marvel: Episode 3 “Destined” Review

It’s Marvel Wednesday and today that doesn’t just come with a review for Ms. Marvel’s third episodeDestined“! but also a little announcement from me. Spoilers ahead from here on out!

credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

Kamala’s new acquaintances need her help, while her hands are full with her brother’s wedding and the looming presence of the Department of Damage Control.

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Hawkeye: Episode 3 “Echoes” Review

Albeit a little later in the day, you know the drill! It’s Wednesday, so we are reviewing/recap-ing Marvel’s Hawkeye episode 3 titled “Echoes” – there are spoilers from here on out!

credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

After getting captured by the Tracksuit Mafia, Clint and Kate have to fight their way out.

My thoughts?

I liked the episode, don’t get me wrong, but not a lot actually happened. It furthered the show’s main conflict a bit and established our antagonists, but in terms of story progression, we haven’t really gone much farther. I don’t see that as a huge issue, especially because I like getting to know characters on a deeper level, which this show provides, but we only have three more episodes. They are going to have to either a) wrap this up quickly or b) prove me right again in my theory that Marvel/Disney+ shows are only used as lengthy prequels for upcoming movies.

But let’s just break the episode down:

  • We start off with an opening sequence set in 2007 up to present day to show us the evolution of Maya Lopez. It was really beautifully done and conveyed so much about her in little time. For one, we learn how she became so exceptionally gifted at martial arts and other fight techniques, while we also learn about her “connection” to Ronin, due to him killing her father.
    On a side note, I liked the little nod towards dragons, as we now *do* know they are actually real thanks to Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.
  • One of the more crucial hints the opening delivered was a sneak peek at who Maya’s father was working for/with. The man going by Uncle, who is only shown neck down, is very likely Wilson Fisk, also known as Kingpin. I’m beyond curious to see who they have cast for the role and if this might our first hint at the resurfacing of Daredevil in the MCU. (I’ve heard rumors! Let me dream!)

credit: Marvel Studios

  • Then we’re back at the factory hideout of the Tracksuit Mafia with a tied up Kate and Clint. Kate Bishop is such a fun character and throughout the whole episode the grumpy/sunshine dynamic this newfound duo has is very entertaining and works extremely well for me.
  • When Maya faces Kate and Clint for the first time, she actually believes Clint to be able to communicate with ASL as well, but scolds him for relying so much on technology and has to use Kazi as an interpreter instead. Barton eventually gets free and Maya crushes his hearing aid during a fight. While I see her point in how it makes his life harder not knowing how to communicate with others, which also leads to some fun scenes throughout the episode, losing one of his senses doesn’t seem to impact his fighting or bow and arrow skills at all. At least I wasn’t aware of any difficulties there.
  • We get a super cool car chase scene with loads of trick arrows. While I thought that some of the CGI was really noticeable, I generally enjoyed how the scene was shot. They seem to have put someone in the backseat of the car and it really puts you right in the middle of the action with all its shakiness.

credit: Marvel Studios

  • Kate and Clint eventually escape and while they regroup at her aunt’s place, we witness Kate helping Barton with a phone call with his son. These small scenes can be so emotional an impacting, I love them. Because despite Clint being a good man, he has so much doubt in himself. He doesn’t believe to be a particularly great father or role model, no matter if he is one of the greatest archers. This self doubt and regret for his past make him so very human and I love that we get to explore that in this show. And then to have Kate be the balance, this absolute fangirl of his to *show* how much he has done for people – great contrast.
  • Ultimately, the episode ends at Kate’s mother’s apartment. After breaking into the work computer, the duo learns that Kazi works for “Sloan Limited”, which sounds familiar to Clint, but I can’t say it really rings a bell for me. Clint, hearing a noise, investigates and is met with his Ronin blade held by Jack. I don’t think this will be a huge reveal of him as the villain. They did break into the house, so he has an “excuse” to be hostile.

I can only repeat myself, but I think the show shines the most in its quieter moments. As fun as the action is, learning about these characters is what intrigues me. Their emotional turmoil, fears, doubt and what connects them is the driving force. This is, unfortunately, already the halfway point of the series, but I don’t feel we have gotten enough time with them as of yet. I’m very much looking forward to the next episodes though.


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What If … The World Lost Its Mightiest Heroes? Episode Review

Wednesdays are mostly our Marvel review days on the blog, so it’s time to talk about today’s episode of What If …? called What If … The World Lost Its Mightiest Heroes? There will be spoilers from here on out, so proceed with caution.

What If ... Nick Fury
credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

What if someone eliminated the candidates for the Avengers initiative before they ever had a chance to band together? 

My thoughts?

I’m really feeling like I’m having my ups and downs with this show. While I tremendously enjoyed the plot of last week, I was somewhat disappointed with this episode. It wasn’t just the way it felt rushed in the short run time, but it also seemed like the real story only started once it ended. Let us break down what the episode was about!

  • The episode covered the span of a week, with every day more or less featuring the death of one of the Avengers. It all started with Tony Stark’s demise, which Black Widow got framed for. Then, it continued with the assassination of Thor by the hand of Hawkeye, who, just like Black Widow, claims innocence, which was followed by his own death. After that the Hulk literally exploded and even Natasha got found after her escape from SHIELD’s capture and taken down. Nick Fury (alongside Agent Coulson) seemed to be the only one left standing.

Black Widow
credit: Marvel Studios

  • I was somewhat surprised to see Doctor Ross, which is silly, because of course she is part of Bruce’s story, but we haven’t seen her in so long. In fact, in the live action version with the character being portrayed by Mark Ruffalo, she has never even been mentioned.
  • I didn’t see the point of rehashing each death in detail, as few of them have lasting consequences within the episode, except for Thor’s passing. His death prompts Loki to arrive on Earth with an army, vowing to revenge his brother. Fury manages to strike a deal with him by offering him the real assassin in return for leaving the planet in peace.

Thor and his glorious hair
credit: Marvel Studios

  • Natasha, before her final battle, managed to give Fury a hint at who was behind the attacks. She called him and told him that it was all about Hope. We, as devoted MCU viewers, obviously knew right away that it had to do with Hope van Dyne, but she really couldn’t have just told him the full name instead of repeating her first name twice on the message? Seems inefficient to me.
  • In this universe, Hope was an agent of SHIELD, just like her mother before her. They both died on missions, which left a grieving Hank Pym unable to deal with his emotions. He, in his suit could manipulate all the situations without being seen, therefore being the real culprit. He got tricked by Loki, who disguised himself as Fury to coax out a confession, and eventually got taken in by the Asgardian army.
  • Loki wouldn’t be Loki if he didn’t betray someone. So, despite Fury honoring his deal with the trickster God, Loki decides to stay on Earth and without anyone stopping him and a full army to back him, he manages to take over the rule of the planet within a day.

Loki on Earth
credit: Marvel Studios

  • It was odd to see Fury and Coulson so non-chalantly dealing with the alien invasion. However, the episode ends with Captain Marvel showing up for back up and Coulson looking at the frozen shield of Captain America. Maybe in this universe he was never unthawed? We literally don’t find out more as this is where it all fades to black.
  • What I noticed within the episode was that the Watcher was present in the sky/background a lot more obviously than in previous stories. I don’t know why it stood out so much here, but it did. I still wonder if he will really just remain someone to tell us tales or if he will eventually be involved in something as well.

As you can see, I kept that a lot shorter than with previous Marvel reviews or recaps, but I really wasn’t that impressed by the episode. Wouldn’t the meat of the story be about how Fury has to find alternate Avengers team members? How did Loki manage to conquer Earth in a day? There seemed to be exactly zero pushback from anyone as he spoke in front of the UN, which could possibly be because of his large armada, but come on. That was way too easy!

I have no idea what next week’s episode will be about, as I think they’ve only revealed the first three in advance, but I hope it will be something I can be more enthusiastic about again. Not even the funny quips about Thor’s glorious hair could keep me entertained for long here. Maybe I just also didn’t want to watch all the Avengers die … again. See you for more next week!


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What did you think of this episode? Did you like it? Did you agree with my opinion? Let’s talk!

Loki: Episode 4 “The Nexus Event” Review

Once again, I’m coming to you with an all new Loki review/recap! Beware of spoilers for this week’s episode “The Nexus Event” moving forward!

credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

Suspicions grow among the TVA agents as the two Lokis are captured.

My thoughts?

My head is still spinning a little bit, if I’m being completely honest. I keep thinking that I know what’s going to happen, just to be surprised by some (albeit not all) developments. As with previous Marvel shows, we’re really getting into the nitty-gritty parts of the series in its second half. I like that I at least know to expect that much from the narrative.

Now where to start with this week’s breakdown? How about the beginning!

  • We finally learn how Sylvie got involved with the TVA. Although we never find out what Nexus event caused her to be taken in, we start off the episode with a little flashback. Ravonna, still being a Hunter back then, tracks down Sylvie when she was just a child to arrest her for crimes against the sacred timeline. At court, Sylvie manages to steal Ravonna’s TemPad and flee into the timeline, having jumped through place and time ever since. It’s so heartbreaking to watch, because Sylvie literally never did anything wrong. She just existed and was a mere child, who then got to grow up during the ends of a thousand worlds. I’m honestly surprised she isn’t more messed up.

credit: Marvel Studios

  • While everyone at the TVA is scrambling to find the Variants, Loki and Sylvie have one more essential bonding moment as the world around them is ending. Sylvie shares her past, Loki genuinely seems to care about her. It’s now evident that I wasn’t imagining the heavy romantic undertones last time, because them holding hands and developing feelings for one another causes one of the biggest and most drastic Nexus events – ultimately leading the TVA to them and saving them before they perish on Lamentis.
    HOWEVER, according to Kate Herron, this relationship is “not necessarily romantic”. I think people will find it difficult to not see that side, just because Mobius straight out calls it a crush later on in the episode, but I do see her point. It could all just be an elaborate tale of self-love and acceptance. Then again, Michael Waldron (showrunner) said they were falling for each other. No clue anymore. I will have to see future episodes to really tell, because not going to lie to you all, I still haven’t decided how I fell about a possible romance. It 100% makes sense with Loki’s narcissistic nature, but it’s also twisted.
  • Loki and Sylvie get separated, with Loki being put in a Time Cell. In there, he has to relive a bad memory with Lady Sif (what a fun and unexpected cameo and very on brand with the actual mythology) and it was really interesting to see him come to realizations about himself throughout that looped bad interaction. I think his feelings for Sylvie (whatever they may be) really clicked in that cell as well, because he kept being told that he was alone and always would be, but with Sylvie he really found someone who understood him.
  • Throughout the entire episode, we can see the growing suspicion about the TVA with several agents. Mobius’ doubt is fueled by his budding friendship with Loki and the desire to want to believe the trickster. B-15 got to experience memories while she was enchanted by Sylvie and even temporarily breaks her out to see more of her previous life. All the while, Ravonna becomes more and more shady as she hid the real reason C-20 passed away or why she wants to keep Sylvie isolated.
  • It all comes to a head when Mobius tries to side with Loki and gets pruned by Ravonna. You could see they had a special relationship and that it wasn’t easy on her, but she didn’t hesitate to have him erased. Her character seems to grow darker with each bit of information we learn about her. And losing Mobius … that was tough to watch, especially because Loki had grown really attached to him and so have we, as viewers, in the short span of time.
  • Ultimately, Loki and Sylvie both get brought in front of the Time-Keepers to get pruned themselves. B-15 shows up in the nick of time to bring Sylvie her trusted sword and a fight ensues. It looked like the Lokis were doing well, having defeated almost everyone and facing the Time-Keepers, just to find out they are fake and mindless androids. So, who is truly behind the TVA? Is Ravonna working for the real masterminds? Your guess is as good as mine.

credit: Marvel Studios

  • In what looked like Loki trying to confess his feelings for Sylvie (again, let those be whatever they are?), us viewers get dealt one final blow – Ravonna prunes Loki. I knew he wouldn’t be gone. This is his show after all, but … that moment hurt. He came such a long way.

We got our first post-credit scene! I was waiting for it, because I knew it was going to happen in the second half of the season. I’m glad they didn’t leave us with too much of a cliffhanger as to what happened to Loki after he got pruned, but rather with more excitement and even more Lokis! (We have a spectacular Richard E. Grant in classic Loki attire, a kid Loki, boastful Loki AND alligator Loki!) I’m currently loving the theory that they are at a place where all the things that get erased go.

credit: Marvel Studios

When Tom Hiddleston said that episode 4 and 5 were going to be game changers, he wasn’t lying. Aside from the fact that the body count went up considerably … so much just happened! While the suspicions towards the TVA were always warranted, I have an incredibly hard time imagining where all of this is supposed to go. No matter where we end up though, I keep enjoying the ride! All these characters are so well developed that I don’t even mind a couple smaller plotholes here and there.

For all time! – Always! – Until next week!


PREVIOUS LOKI REVIEWS

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What are your feelings concerning all these new developments? I’d love to hear your thoughts!!

Loki: Episode 3 “Lamentis” Review

I’m writing this under a bit of a time crunch, so I really hope this won’t be too much of a mess. Either way, please beware of spoilers for Loki’s episode 3 “Lamentis” moving forward!

credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

Loki and the Variant find themselves in a life or death situation and have to work together to get out of it.

My thoughts?

What an interesting change of pace for Loki (and not just because it was 10 minutes shorter than episodes 1 and 2). While I thoroughly enjoyed the Loki-Mobius-dynamic prior to this episode, I must say I really am into this exploration of Loki and the Variant. I must say that this show keeps reminding me more and more of Doctor Who the further we get along. I don’t know if it’s the nature of time travel or the Doctor/companion vibes I’m getting, but it definitely feels reminiscent of the classic sci-fi series.

But, first things first, is Sophia Di Martino playing Lady Loki? I think the question was a bit difficult to answer before, but Lamentis shed some light on the situation. She is credited as Sylvie, which led many people to believe she is actually Enchantress. Well, I feel like they may have blended the two characters together. From what we’ve learned, she used to be Lady Loki, but prefers being called Sylvie now. Her powers are effectively described as “enchanting people”, so it makes sense to think she is a mix of the two and honestly, why not? I know they were both iconic in their own rights, but these MCU shows really need to keep things fresh in order for the content to not get too predictable. Also, it just makes reviewing so much easier when they don’t have the same name.

Now, let’s break down the episode:

  • We start off with a little flashback of how Sylvie extracted the information she needed about the Time-Keepers from C-20. Her powers allow her to invade strong-willed minds by creating a fantasy from their memories. This, later on, leads to a huge reveal concerning the TVA. All the employees, which were supposedly created by the Time-Keepers, were once regular people and are just variants as well. Although, some brain fog prevents them from knowing that information. Loki was quite shocked to find out that bit of information and I am seriously intrigued how that revelation will play out for characters such as Mobius. This annihilates their entire world view.
  • After the exciting end of last week’s episode, we learn that Sylvie simply portalled back to the TVA. There, her plan is interrupted by Loki, who got his hands on his beloved daggers again. They fight, get disturbed in their bickering by Renslayer and, in an attempt to flee, end up on Lamentis – a doomed planet.
  • Because the TemPad they used is out of juice, they are now stuck in an apocalyptic event, having to work together to either find a new power source or get off the planet before a moon crashes into it.

credit: Marvel Studios

For once, I don’t think I need to go into every little detail the episode provided, as it was clearly focusing on the Loki-Sylvie-relationship. They know virtually nothing about each other, despite being a supposed version of one another. I had a hard time knowing the intention behind their interactions, which is untypical for me. Usually, I can sense where a dynamic is supposed to go, but I got odd flirtatious undertones and I felt weird about that. Maybe that’s just me, I don’t want to judge. Obviously, there’s a lot of mistrust and trying to get useful information out of the other, but they also had some genuine bonding moments.

Mini highlight of the episode for me: Tom Hiddleston drunkenly singing a song in Asgardian (which just sounded Norwegian in part to me) about “when she sings, she sings come home”

Aside from them constantly fighting and bickering, Loki and Sylvie more or less compared powers, childhoods (Sylvie knew she was adopted and only has a hazy memory of their mother – did she pass away sooner?) and love lives. I was so very happy that Loki is now finally a confirmed queer character by admitting to having had past relationships with men and women, despite none of them lasting. The MCU is slow in that regard, but I can see them trying to implement more LGBTQIA+ rep in the next phases.

credit: Marvel Studios

As the two were discussing the meaning of love “Love is hate/love is mischief”, I think Loki was actually on to something with his comparison. It seemed fitting somehow:

Loki: Love is a dagger. It’s a weapon to be wielded far away or up close. You can see yourself in it. It’s beautiful. Until it makes you bleed. But ultimately, when you reach for it …
Sylvie: it isn’t real. It’s just an imaginary dagger.

I always enjoy the callbacks to Frigga, because she was such a beautiful character and shaped the lives of Loki and Thor so much. I’m glad she is not forgotten, although, as I hinted at above, I would really like to know what happened to her in Sylvie’s world.

Anyway, what I took away from “Lamentis” was that Sylvie and Loki would make an excellent team if they just actually worked together. Loki can’t go off and get drunk in the middle of a mission and Sylvie needs to let him in just a tiny bit. Trust is a rare good when it comes to the tricksters, but if they can’t even trust each other, then who is left? They fight really well together (someone get all the MCU stunt coordinators a raise and all the awards!) and their powers compliment each other, although I suspect Loki will try learning some enchanting magic himself soon.

credit: Marvel Studios

While the episode ends on a cliffhanger, with Sylvie and Loki seemingly being stuck on a Lamenits, we know that the show continues, so there must be a way out of it somehow.

It’s so strange to me to think this show is already halfway done again. It feels like just yesterday that my Marvel excitement was spiked up again, yet here we are. Tom Hiddleston said in one of the many interviews preceding the season that he was most looking forward to episode 4 and 5 airing and I feel like that has been the main consensus with all Marvel shows so far. These episodes seem to be the most intense in terms of character depth and development, so I can’t wait for next week! (which will once again be a late review and not out immediately after it airs!!) Let’s see what the show still has in store for us – it’s been a wild ride so far!


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How do you feel about having reached the halfway point of the season already? Do you like the way the show is progressing? Let’s talk!

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier: Episode 3 “Power Broker” Review

As always, the following review/recap for The Falcon and the Winter Soldier will include SPOILERS! Read on at your own discretion.

credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

Sam and Bucky break Zemo out of prison in order to investigate the provenance of the new super solider serum, meeting an old friend on the way. In the meantime, Karli proceeds with her own plans to help the people.

My thoughts?

Can you believe we have already reached the halfway point of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier? The plot keeps on moving, clearing some things up while also raising new questions. This episode felt a bit slower to me than previous ones. There were a lot of locations involved with beautiful but lengthy exhibition shots that felt like filler and made it seem a bit scattered at times. Still, I cannot help but praise the stunt coordinators and choreographers, because every episode delivers on top notch action scenes that never get boring to watch.

We’re also at a point in the show where we have met most (but not all) the important players and it becomes more difficult to balance showcasing each character each episode. I enjoy that they, for example, had very few shots of John Walker this episode, because he got a lot of screen time last week. Instead, we meet old friends and new foes. Let’s dive into everything in a bit more detail.

  • We start off the episode with an ad (which we should be accustomed to from WandaVision by now, but always feels a bit odd to me still) for the Global Repatriation Council – or GRC in short. This organisation is supposed to help people who have returned find their footing in this new and changed world again. They make it look wholesome and good, but Karli and her group know that people are forced to live in crowded camps, getting little to no medical assistance and that governments regularly withhold necessary provisions.
    We also get introduced to someone dear to Karli, who ultimately dies because of the conditions at the camp, furthering her struggle. It adds more depth to Karli’s and the Flag Smasher’s rebellion and explains why people want to rally behind them. During a heist for provisions, Karli shows that she is done playing nice though, causing an explosion and killing several people in a building and therefore proving that she is dangerous in her grief. If she isn’t careful, it could soon create doubt in her character as I don’t believe everyone will like her radicalization.
  • All the while John Walker and Hoskins are scrambling for clues concerning the super soldier serum, showing a growing darkness and Walker getting more unhinged, Bucky and Sam follow their own lead by visiting Zemo. I think the show gave Zemo a great reintroduction to the universe, making his character shine in his own way. There wasn’t too much detail we knew about him, but he now carries himself with more bravado and charm than what I remember from the movie. His prison break was well crafted (when did Bucky have time to set all that up?) and he is sure to cause much tension. There is no way he can be trusted, but within a couple scenes he proves that he is useful (and not just because it turns out he is filthy rich).

credit: Marvel Studios

Once the new team consisting of Sam, Bucky and Zemo arrives in Madripoor, this is where things really kick off. So much information is learned there, but as always I’m going to try and break it off into smaller bits and pieces:

  • In order to not get immediately killed, the threesome have to pretend to be their old selves or someone different entirely. While Sam offers some great humor-filled scenes as The Smiling Tiger, it was jarring to see Bucky having to be the Winter Soldier again. Aside from people filming this and me worrying that the footage getting out could possibly nullify his pardon, I cannot imagine this didn’t take a toll on his mental well being. It warmed my heart to see Sam constantly checking in with him to ask if he was okay. They can pretend to be annoyed by each other all they want, but in the end, they care!
  • Things get a bit more complicated from here on out and I hope I won’t make it too confusing. It basically boils down to the boys making a mess and having a bounty put on their heads, them learning about the doctor who created the serum and having to get saved by the one and only Sharon Carter.
    She is different from when we last saw her. After being on the run for years and still not welcome in her home country, she is disillusioned of star-spangled awesomeness and has hustled her way up in Madripoor instead. She doesn’t hesitate to tell things as they are and the boys probably couldn’t have made five steps in that city without her. Sam ultimately convinces her to help them in exchange for a pardon from the US government. I’m not sure he has the sway to really make that happen, but she does agree to it.
  • Once they find Dr. Wilfred Nagel, (a reference to the comic book doctor who actually gave Isaiah his super strength) we learn that he was originally recruited by the CIA and was given genetic material from Isaiah in order to recreate the serum. After the blip, his project had been abandoned and he was employed by the Power Broker to continue his work. Zemo, who likely doesn’t want to see any more super soldiers in his lifetime and has made a point about how people glorify them and put them on a pedestal, goes to the drastic measure of simply killing Dr. Nagel and destroying the entire lab. It takes a shootout with the mercenaries that are at their heels to get them out of that place.
  • So, who is the Power Broker? There’s many theories going around about this. We know the Power Broker is an independent third party, not affiliated with a government. They have considerable amount of money and obviously power. They, too, are on the hunt for Karli since she stole the serum, but who is behind them? My bet is on Sharon Carter herself for now.
    Her appearance was mighty convenient and the way she exited those docks seemed like she was backed by someone powerful, or is possibly that powerful person herself. As always, I could definitely be wrong, but I also wouldn’t necessarily be surprised. I don’t think it would make her villain either. She had to do what she did to survive and no one can blame her for thriving and being good at what she does. Did you see how she took out a dozen mercenaries by herself? I would not mess with her.

credit: Marvel Studios

The entire ordeal in Madripoor made Sam reconsider his stance on the shield. He felt like he shouldn’t have given it up to the museum, but rather should have destroyed it, to which Bucky immediately replies that it has too much meaning and that he would rather take it for himself to become the new Cap than see it gone entirely. Such a small statement, and yet it carries so many implications with it. We know that Sam doesn’t feel ready to carry the shield, despite Steve having left it to him. Imposter syndrome is real and we have additionally seen the struggles he faces because of race and how a Black super soldier was treated by the government before, I understand his hesitations 100%, but I also think that statement hurt him a little bit. There was this flicker in his eyes and I hope it was the spark needed to get Sam Wilson on the road to actually becoming Captain America one day! It’s the ride I am here for.

Towards the end of the episode, we see Walker and Hoskins puzzling together the pieces of Zemo’s prison break with them going off the books and on the hunt for Sam and Bucky. I would be surprised if this doesn’t end in some sort of showdown between the duos.

At the same time, Sam, Bucky and Zemo are following their next lead already. When Bucky first said he needed to go for a walk to get some air, I thought he actually needed alone time (silly me), but he found trackers like bread crumbs and followed them to let us meet another surprise appearance – Ayo!
As Sam mentioned earlier on in the episode, Wakanda would not take lightly to Zemo being freed. Ayo, as part of the Dora Milaje, having been King T’Chaka’s security detail on that fateful day in Vienna when Zemo caused his death, would definitely be the last person to let his escape slide. I loved that Bucky immediately recognized the Wakandan tech and I’m very interested to see how he is going to stall her so she won’t go killing Zemo while he needs him. They definitely left us on a great cliffhanger here.

credit: Marvel Studios

Ultimately, I keep enjoying the show. I keep feeling engaged by the storyline and wanting to know what happens next. I am not trying to decipher as much as I did with WandaVision and rather try to just enjoy the ride, hoping that they will make it all come together in the end. By now, they have so much previous history to consider and need to be careful not to contradict themselves, but by adding small and fun callbacks to old scenes (e.g. the mention of “Travel Man” by Marvin Gaye or Sam/Bucky refusing to move the car seat for the other person, …) they seem to be on the right way, making it all feel connected.

Side note: Marvel has got to stop putting their characters all over the world and then having the actors and glorified extras butcher the languages. It’s painful and completely takes you out of the setting at times, because all authenticity is gone. I appreciate the efforts of making it global, because the world is larger than the US, but there’s a better way to do that.


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What did you think of this week’s episode? Are you enjoying the show? Let’s talk!

WandaVision: Episode 3 “Now in Color” Review

As promised, I am back with another WandaVision review! As with the previous post, I would like to point out that this is meant to be read after watching the episode to avoid any kind of spoilers. I will not hold back!

credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

After discovering Wanda’s fast pregnancy, the pair tries to prepare for the imminent birth as best as possible, all the while fighting off their growing suspicions of something being off in Westview.

My thoughts?

As we are hurtling through the decades with WandaVision, now squarely in the 70s, I adore how easily recognizable they make their inspiration in terms of intro and style of the episode. This time we clearly got an homage to the Brady Bunch, which seems fitting as it was the birth of the (at least to Wanda and Vision) unexpected twins.

In the comics, their sons William and Thomas (on the show only lovingly called Billy and Tommy for now) mirror the powers of Wanda and her late twin brother Pietro. It will be interesting to see where they go with the boys on the show as their lore in Marvel history thus far is quite scattered. It does, however, point to the much suggested involvement of Mephisto in whatever is happening to Wanda. Since it has been said that WandaVision will also heavily tie into Doctor Strange’s Multiverse of Madness and Mephisto is a main antagonist of Doctor Strange (and often Spider-Man too) as well as Stephen Strange being a big part of the twins’ lives, things are shaping up to go even more into that direction. We shall see!

credit: Marvel Studios

I do enjoy the general progression of the show! Much of the appeal is due to the dichotomy between fun, silly sitcom tropes and the complete tonal shift to dread and more serious matters. Both, Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany, deserve a tremendous amount of praise for how quickly they manage to switch between these contrasting emotions and portrayals. It’s often quite chilling to go from discomfort to bliss in an instant. I wasn’t sure how soon they would get into the nitty-gritty of their world, but I thought there were some incredible revelations this week.

I’ve mentioned before that I believed that important moments were shown mostly through Wanda’s eyes, but this week had an interesting shift to include major moments with Vision alone. He seems to be more plagued by whatever is off about their town and neighbors than Wanda is, which makes sense in that we believe she is partially responsible for what is going on. Once again, he got cut off by Wanda when he started asking too many questions (prompting me to believe my internet wasn’t working right, when it really was some smart editing choices). It shows an awareness and consciousness on his part that I probably did not expect in a character that is supposed to be deceased and possibly only imaginary.

This time, I have no useful theory about the “commercial break”. It was obviously a Hydra reference again, prompting the potential customers to find their inner goddess. If my suggestions last time had been correct, with the ads pointing to significant events in Wanda’s life in chronological order, there should have been an Ultron or Quicksilver reference, but we got that from Geraldine instead.

UPDATE on Hyrda Soak and it’s possible connection to previous Marvel content:

credit: Marvel Studios

While Vision was off on his own, getting warnings about Geraldine having no home, family or husband in Westview, Wanda also had a confrontation with the very same woman. If the final scenes of the episode are anything to go by, it looks like Westview is a very real town, but shut off from the rest of the world and suspended in old-timey sitcom bliss. Whoever lives there is bound to it and cannot leave. It looked like Wanda was not pleased to have her possibly self-made reality disturbed by a S.W.O.R.D. agent and therefore kicked Geraldine/Monica out, once again confirming that she has tremendous power over what is happening.

Now that we know all that, I simply have to wonder why Agnes and Herb showed concern about Geraldine’s presence in Westview and why Agnes stopped Herb from saying anything more to Vision. Clearly, they are stuck in that town as well, but do they not want to get out or are they worried that confronting Wanda (and Vision) with reality would end up putting them in danger? As Agnes is rumored to be Agatha Harkness, a fellow witch and potential villain, she might also have her own interest at heart in keeping Wanda put. It’s fair to say that I am curious! While the episode definitely answered some questions, it also opened up an onslaught of new ones!

I have to say, I wish they would continue with airing two episodes each week. On the one hand, I am glad that I am forced to be patient instead of binging it all in one go and then being miserable it’s all over, but on the other hand, 30-minute-long episodes are just not enough. This show is so much fun and so brilliantly intricate, I just want more.


Are you all caught up on WandaVision? Did you enjoy their take on the 70s? Let’s chat!