What If … Thor Were an Only Child? Episode Review

Once again, I’m a little late, but I have written a review for the latest episode of What If …? titled What If … Thor Were an Only Child? From here on forward, there will be spoilers for the episode!

What If ... Thor Were an Only Child?
credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

Thor, who never had to compete with or set an example for his brother, turned out quite differently – he became the Party Prince of Asgard!

My thoughts?

We’ve established by now that I’m not the biggest fan of the show, so I don’t think we need to harp on it much more. I was, however, actually looking forward to Party-Thor, just because I knew it would be a more light-hearted episode and it didn’t disappoint in that regard. Then again, much like last week, this episode didn’t feel too imaginative to me. Did not having a brother really change Thor all that much, or were his parents just more lenient? I almost believe it’s the latter, but let’s just break down the episode bit by bit.

  • In this universe, Odin never adopted/kidnapped Loki and instead returned him to his birth father. This must have also quelled the war/animosity between Asgard and the Frost Giants, as it doesn’t seem to be an issue henceforth. This led to Thor and Loki growing up as friends, however, never as real brothers.

More than battles won or lost, it’s relationships that truly define a hero. The people who shape them, their stories.

What If ... Thor Were an Only Child?
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Back on Earth Dr. Jane Foster and Darcy Lewis notice a pattern from outer space, guessing an alien invasion is about to happen. While they are right about the visitors being from somewhere else in the galaxy, it’s actually just Thor and his friend group deciding to go on a bender while Odin is asleep and Frigga is off to visit her sisters.
  • I’m not going to go into detail, but Thor turns the entire planet into an intergalactic party central and apparently once partied so hard on Alpha Star, it destroyed the whole thing. Jane, who met and fell in love with Thor in this version too (they even got matching tattoos), worries that he will accidentally be the end of Earth. Death by party?
What If ... Thor Were an Only Child?
credit: Marvel Studios
  • The cameos in this episode are almost boundless. You have several characters from the Thor movies (Korg, the Grandmaster, Skurge, …), The Guardians of the Galaxy (Drax, Mantis, Nebula, …) as well as Howard the Duck again. Howard even gets married to Darcy. I’m not joking. That happened!
What If ... Thor Were an Only Child?
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Maria Hill, who is acting director of SHIELD after Fury had a run in with an overexcited Korg, is ready to bring in the big guns to fight Thor and calls in Captain Marval aka Carol Danvers. They have a fight around the globe, but ultimately it is Jane who stops Thor by ratting him out to his mother.
  • All the alien visitors help Thor clean up his mess on Earth, but he still gets caught. It nevertheless serves as a lesson to the God of Thunder to become more mature and he eventually asks out Jane on a real date. The end? Happily ever after? Not quite!
  • The final scene, because why would we ever just end on a happy note, showed an evil Ultron appearing with all infinity stones. What does it mean? Who even knows at this point …

I’m a little tired of the cliffhangers, BUT I am intrigued by this one in particular. The thing is, The Watcher seemed surprised by the end himself. So far, no matter how bleak the outcome, he always knew that it had to be the fate of that particular universe or character. However, at the end of the episode, he appeared to be flustered by the appearance of Ultron, possibly not expecting it. So, what could it mean?
I can’t help but wonder if this Ultron breached from a different universe, which would slowly fold into the Loki series storyline of the multiversal chaos we are about to witness. The only reason I’m hesitant to fully buy into this theory is that his infinity stones would effectively be useless if he were from another universe. At least in the comics, it is impossible for more than one set of infinity stones to exist in the same realm and remain powerful. It’s like they cancel each other out.
Another theory is that he might be from the future, which would still work, but not really explain the Watcher’s surprise. We might never get an answer, so this could potentially just remain another frustrating loose end, but there is a chance that this might be the first multi-chapter story within the What If …? stories. We shall see!

What If ... Thor Were an Only Child?
credit: Marvel Studios

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What did you think of the episode? Did you enjoy it? Let’s talk!

What If … Killmonger Rescued Tony Stark? Episode Review/Shang-Chi Movie Review

Wednesday is Marvel day on the blog! As fate will have it, I don’t just have a What If … review planned for you today, but also one for Shang-Chi! I hope you’re up for a little double-feature and ready for spoilers ahead.

What If ... Killmonger Rescued Tony Stark?
credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

What if Tony Stark never had a change of heart and instead invited a villain into his life? Well, you’d get the plot of this episode.

My thoughts?

After the last two weeks, this episode felt a little bit lackluster to me. There’s really no other way to say this, but I’m extremely tired of having to watch Tony Stark die and while Erik “Killmonger” Stevens is a fascinating character, this didn’t add much to his arc. But I’m getting ahead of myself, let’s break it down:

Heroes are not born. They’re forged in darkness, shaped in battle, defined by sacrifice.

  • The age of Iron Man never comes to pass as Tony gets rescued by Erik “Killmonger” Stevens in Afghanistan and therefore never has a change of heart. Instead of rethinking Stark Industries entire business model, he basically believes it is necessary to just create more and better weapons.
  • To show his gratitude, Tony makes Killmonger first his new chief of security, but quickly promotes him to COO. While he believes to have found a like-minded soul, Erik has other plans.
What If ... Killmonger Rescued Tony Stark?
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Killmonger uses Tony to his advantage in several ways. First, he gets him to help build Project Liberator, war drones that fight like humans and look like something out of an anime (their reference, not mine). But he also uses Stark Industries to create a paper trail that leads to Tony rather than himself.
  • In an attempt to acquire vibranium for the drones, Erik sets up Rhodey as well as T’Challa and kills both in the process. After Tony finds out, because he’s still whip-smart, Erik also kills him, but stages it to make it look like the Dora Milaje did it in the name of Wakanda.
  • An outright war is about to start between the US and Wakanda, because of Killmonger’s meddling. But all of this was part of his plan, as he intends to use this situation to weasel his way into the griefing royal family of Wakanda and become the new Black Panther. He ultimately succeeds in getting that power, but T’Challa, on the astral plane, warns him that power unearned can be a very volatile force.
What If ... Killmonger Rescued Tony Stark?
credit: Marvel Studios
  • At the end, we can see that the US military is still willing to fight Wakanda, whereas Pepper is at her wits end as to why people won’t believe that Killmonger was behind all of it. Luckily, Shuri shows up and they band together to expose Erik.

Heroes are never really gone. They live forever. As do the ones they inspire to carry on the fight.

As mentioned above, I wasn’t majorly impressed by the episode. All the characters are great, that’s not the issue, but I just didn’t feel like it added much to the narrative we already knew, aside from more people dying. And again, I’m tired of certain characters passing on this show over and over, because I don’t need to keep seeing that.

You all know this show is very hit or miss with me, so I hope you won’t take my very average response to heart too much. I just think that What If …? banks a lot on viewers nostalgia to get their story across and that, most of the time, the episodes themselves don’t warrant that much of an emotional or impressed response. I don’t think that their storytelling in general is that great, but I still wonder if this will play into the bigger MCU at all. In case it doesn’t, I’m not sure I will tune in to all the episodes of Season 2, which is confirmed.


PREVIOUSLY: WHAT IF …


SHANG-CHI AND THE LEGEND OF THE TEN RINGS

I usually don’t pile on with reviews like that, but somehow, seeing that Tony’s arc technically had a lot to do with the Ten Rings, I thought it was only fitting I’d also include my Shang-Chi review today!

I kidd you not, I haven’t been to a cinema since February 2020, so this was a huge deal for me. The large screen, the giddy atmosphere, the shared experience, the popcorn (which just never tastes the same when you have to microwave a pack at home), the all around immersive feeling – I’m so very glad I got to celebrate my return to a movie theater with Shang-Chi.

Marvel movies fall into a very common storytelling structure each time, and Shang-Chi is no exception. On the one hand, the structure has proven to work, but on the other hand, it makes everything a little predictable. However, Shang-Chi works so well due to its fantastic cast, amazing fight choreography and the mix between banter and emotional hooks. The friendship between Simu Liu’s character and Awkwafina’s character was great, as they remained platonic throughout, but the film also showed really amazing familial relationships. As far as MCU origin movies go, this is really on the upper end of the spectrum.

At this point, the whole Marvel lore is so vast and interconnected, I know that it has taken out the joy for some people. I love that there wasn’t any previous knowledge necessary to watch Shang-Chi. Yes, you would miss references to Iron Man movies, Doctor Strange characters and the likes, but does it really matter? The story stands on its own and will continue within the universe (seriously can’t wait for more of these characters to come!!!), but also works as a standalone movie.

Little tip: there’s one mid-credit and one after-credit scene. Just in case the light turns on after the first one, like it did in my theater, and a bunch of people leave and miss the second one.

more of these three, pretty please!

What are your thoughts on the episode and the movie? Let’s talk!

What If … Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands? Episode Review

It’s Wednesday and we all know this means it’s time for another Marvel review! Today we’re talking about What If … Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands?, so continue at your own peril. Spoilers ahead!

What If ... Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands?
credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

Doctor Strange’s entire life changes when he loses Doctor Christine Palmer in an accident rather than his motor skills.

My thoughts?

So, that was quite something! Maybe I will really like every other What If …? reality more than the previous one. This episode truly felt like the Marvel version of a Black Mirror story and I didn’t mind it. That obviously means that the ending was quite depressing, which probably won’t be to everyone’s liking, but if you think about it, it is also not very likely that every reality in the multiverse is a happy one. Let’s break down the events of What If … Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands?

  • Stephen Strange and Christine Palmer were on a date. They were goofing off, clearly having a great relationship, when the dreadful car accident happens. Instead of Stephen losing the precise motor skills in his surgeon hands, he loses Christine, the love of his life, instead.
  • I thought it was interesting that his grief for her sent him on the same journey as the despair about his hands did. He traveled the world, eventually trained in the mystic arts and became the Sorcerer Supreme. However, it’s after that, where the story really changes.
What If ... Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands?
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Unable to let go of the past, Stephen uses the Eye of Agamotto to travel back in time and redo his date with Christine. No matter what he tries, even if he stays away completely, she always dies though. Her death turning out to be an absolute point in time, unchangeable and irreversible.
  • The Ancient One tries to warn and explain to Stephen that he is endangering the entire universe with his obsession, but they fight and he escapes to the lost library of Cagliostro. There, in the midst of all the hidden mystic knowledge, he learns that he can reverse an absolute point in time, but will need more power. This power can be absorbed from other beings. While a regular person would probably stop at the thought of consuming creatures, Doctor Strange goes on to absorb every powerful being, small or big, he can find (yes, the tentacle monster from What If … Captain Carter Were the First Avenger? makes a reappearance) for centuries.
  • What this version of Doctor Strange wasn’t prepared for was the fact that his last interaction with the Ancient One led to a split timeline. All the while he got stronger, there was another half of him, who hadn’t chosen to change time, running around and still being good. This means we got a Doctor Strange vs. Doctor Strange face off.
What If ... Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands?
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Where a usual Disney or happy storyline would have the good Stephen, the hero, win, this story is not that. The evil and now monstrous looking Doctor Strange cannot convince his counterpart to help him save Christine. So, instead, he even consumes himself, ultimately resurrecting Christine into a crumbling universe.
  • Christine doesn’t recognize Stephen when she comes to. He looks like an amalgamation of all the monsters and creatures he consumed, having no resemblance of his former self anymore. But worst of all, his entire effort was for nothing as Christine starts to disintegrate with the rest of the universe. He had broken the fabric of his reality to the point of no return. Even begging the Watcher himself to help resulted in nothing. So, Stephen created a bubble to shield him and Christine from the destruction, but in the end, he was all alone in vast nothingness.
What If ... Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands?
credit: Marvel Studios

Something I enjoyed a lot during What If … Doctor Strange Lost His Heart Instead of His Hands? is the fact that The Watcher was involved, albeit he did not intervene. In one of the earlier scenes, The Watcher talked to us and told us that Stephen was on the wrong path. He could intervene, but the safety of one universe was not more important than the others, while he also didn’t think that Strange would actually listen. However, Stephen did hear him and later directly talked to him. As I said last week, he seems to get more present in the storylines each week. Be it in the imagery or by actually talking with the characters now. I wonder if this will amp up even more in the future.

While I still think that the episodes deserve to be longer to make full use of the storylines and the potential emotional impact, it worked better here than with some previous ones. Once again, there were some fun visual and dialogue references to movies we know. There was a whole montage of how Stephen learned his craft and jokes about his name and hilarious moments with the cloak. At the end of all of this, I might do a personal ranking of all the What If …? episodes. Would anyone be interested in that?


PREVIOUSLY: WHAT IF …


What did you think of this episode? Did it shake you in any way? Did you agree with my opinion? Let’s talk!

What If … The World Lost Its Mightiest Heroes? Episode Review

Wednesdays are mostly our Marvel review days on the blog, so it’s time to talk about today’s episode of What If …? called What If … The World Lost Its Mightiest Heroes? There will be spoilers from here on out, so proceed with caution.

What If ... Nick Fury
credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

What if someone eliminated the candidates for the Avengers initiative before they ever had a chance to band together? 

My thoughts?

I’m really feeling like I’m having my ups and downs with this show. While I tremendously enjoyed the plot of last week, I was somewhat disappointed with this episode. It wasn’t just the way it felt rushed in the short run time, but it also seemed like the real story only started once it ended. Let us break down what the episode was about!

  • The episode covered the span of a week, with every day more or less featuring the death of one of the Avengers. It all started with Tony Stark’s demise, which Black Widow got framed for. Then, it continued with the assassination of Thor by the hand of Hawkeye, who, just like Black Widow, claims innocence, which was followed by his own death. After that the Hulk literally exploded and even Natasha got found after her escape from SHIELD’s capture and taken down. Nick Fury (alongside Agent Coulson) seemed to be the only one left standing.
Black Widow
credit: Marvel Studios
  • I was somewhat surprised to see Doctor Ross, which is silly, because of course she is part of Bruce’s story, but we haven’t seen her in so long. In fact, in the live action version with the character being portrayed by Mark Ruffalo, she has never even been mentioned.
  • I didn’t see the point of rehashing each death in detail, as few of them have lasting consequences within the episode, except for Thor’s passing. His death prompts Loki to arrive on Earth with an army, vowing to revenge his brother. Fury manages to strike a deal with him by offering him the real assassin in return for leaving the planet in peace.
Thor and his glorious hair
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Natasha, before her final battle, managed to give Fury a hint at who was behind the attacks. She called him and told him that it was all about Hope. We, as devoted MCU viewers, obviously knew right away that it had to do with Hope van Dyne, but she really couldn’t have just told him the full name instead of repeating her first name twice on the message? Seems inefficient to me.
  • In this universe, Hope was an agent of SHIELD, just like her mother before her. They both died on missions, which left a grieving Hank Pym unable to deal with his emotions. He, in his suit could manipulate all the situations without being seen, therefore being the real culprit. He got tricked by Loki, who disguised himself as Fury to coax out a confession, and eventually got taken in by the Asgardian army.
  • Loki wouldn’t be Loki if he didn’t betray someone. So, despite Fury honoring his deal with the trickster God, Loki decides to stay on Earth and without anyone stopping him and a full army to back him, he manages to take over the rule of the planet within a day.
Loki on Earth
credit: Marvel Studios
  • It was odd to see Fury and Coulson so non-chalantly dealing with the alien invasion. However, the episode ends with Captain Marvel showing up for back up and Coulson looking at the frozen shield of Captain America. Maybe in this universe he was never unthawed? We literally don’t find out more as this is where it all fades to black.
  • What I noticed within the episode was that the Watcher was present in the sky/background a lot more obviously than in previous stories. I don’t know why it stood out so much here, but it did. I still wonder if he will really just remain someone to tell us tales or if he will eventually be involved in something as well.

As you can see, I kept that a lot shorter than with previous Marvel reviews or recaps, but I really wasn’t that impressed by the episode. Wouldn’t the meat of the story be about how Fury has to find alternate Avengers team members? How did Loki manage to conquer Earth in a day? There seemed to be exactly zero pushback from anyone as he spoke in front of the UN, which could possibly be because of his large armada, but come on. That was way too easy!

I have no idea what next week’s episode will be about, as I think they’ve only revealed the first three in advance, but I hope it will be something I can be more enthusiastic about again. Not even the funny quips about Thor’s glorious hair could keep me entertained for long here. Maybe I just also didn’t want to watch all the Avengers die … again. See you for more next week!


PREVIOUSLY: WHAT IF …


What did you think of this episode? Did you like it? Did you agree with my opinion? Let’s talk!

What If … T’Challa Became a Star-Lord? Episode Review

It’s Wednesday and at this point, we all know that means it’s Marvel day on the blog! Today’s review is for What If … T’Challa Became a Star-Lord? Proceed with caution, because there are spoilers!!

credit: Marvel Studios

What was it about?

When you outsource a job, it can go awry. So, instead of abducting a young Peter Quill, Yondu and the Ravagers take in T’Challa, altering future events entirely.

My thoughts?

This episode was so much more after my taste! This is exactly the kind of “what if” scenario I was looking for!!

Let’s start off by saying that this episode was dedicated to our hero, our inspiration Chadwick Boseman. I wasn’t prepared for how emotional I got at hearing him voice T’Challa, but I’m so happy it exists. And on top of that, he got such a beautiful episode about family and kinship, paralleling what a bright light he was.

While I’m still no fan of the overexposed animation style and I don’t think that the characters look like their live-action counterparts, I can 100% say that I’m now more on board with the story ideas. What If … T’Challa Became a Star-Lord was not just fun to watch, but also showed far more drastic differences in the universe, prompted by just one small change. Let’s break it down:

  • Alternate title suggestion for the episode: Yondu kidnapping random Earth children since 1988
  • Because the Ravagers got distracted by the vibranium beneath Wakanda’s soil, they kidnapped T’Challa instead of Peter Quill. Since he had felt restless and wanted to explore the world either way, Yondu took it upon himself to show little T’Challa the whole galaxy instead
  • Whereas no one really knew Quill’s Star-Lord, T’Challa quickly made a name for himself. When he steals, he does so to give to the less fortunate. He’s kind of a space Robin Hood like that and therefore has a growing fanbase everywhere. All he wants to do is good and he has an entire crew that supports him in doing so. Nothing can dim that boys light.
  • I think one of the most interesting remarks happens at a casual get together of the crew for drinks, when it is revealed that T’Challa single-handedly prevented Thanos from going through with his plan with … words. He proved that there were other ways to relocate half the universe’s resources and Thanos gave in to reason (despite still joking that “it’s no genocide if it’s random but it would be more efficient” to whoever is nearby). Just imagine all of the pain from Infinity War and End Game being redundant if someone had reasonably and level-headedly talked to Thanos. It’s a really wild thought to me.
  • At the bar, we also meet Drax, who still has his wife and daughter thanks to T’Challa. That man really saved a lot of lives throughout the universe.
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Even odder might be the insinuation that Nebula (now with a long blonde wig and not nearly as cut up and made of parts as we know her) and T’Challa being romantically involved. There definitely was something flirty about her calling him ChaCha and my brain doesn’t quite compute. T’Challa even wanted to convince Nebula and Thanos to go to family counseling. They are that close.
  • I won’t go into detail about the entire thing that went down with the Collector, but there were so many fun details in that bit. For one, he had items such as Hela’s headpiece or Cap’s shield in his possession, but he also had Howard the Duck as one of his prisoners. I was waiting to see how he’d appear and he did not disappoint. I’m sure there will be plenty of videos breaking down what all was mentioned, be it Frost Giants or the dagger imbued by Dark Matter. There’s a lot to discover in the Collector’s lair.
credit: Marvel Studios
  • Eventually, the episode leads towards a confrontation between Yondu and T’Challa, because the former lied to the latter about the fate of Wakanda. While Yondu claimed it was destroyed in a war, T’Challa’s father had actually been looking for him, even among the stars, this entire time. They return to earth and have a little (really brief) nice family reunion. They all get along well and even though it’s an odd combination, having this found and blood family join ranks worked for me.
  • Like last week, there is a cliffhanger again, although I would claim this one is much, much bigger. As the Watcher lets us know, there’s another family reunion in the works. Ego has traveled to earth to meet Peter Quill, a meeting that could result in the end of the world.

Ultimately, I enjoyed that there was a certain focus on nature vs. nurture, found family as well as the one you are born into. There were really several beautiful (albeit short) parent-child-moments and those always go straight to my heart. I can’t deny that some changes just felt weird, but I liked this episode a lot! I may or may not have shed some tears when the dedication popped up on the screen, but what can you do? In the end, I’m a big softie.

credit: Marvel Studios

PREVIOUSLY: WHAT IF …


What are your thoughts? I think it’s clear that I was way more enthusiastic this week! Let’s talk!

Doctor Who: The Woman Who Lived

So, as mentioned last week, The Woman Who Lived was the second part to The Girl Who Died. As always when it comes to Doctor Who, please beware of Spoilers coming ahead!

thewomanwholived

What was it about?

The Doctor is looking for an alien artifact on earth and runs into Ashildr or as she now likes to call herself (Lady) Me. Time has not been kind to her and she has become bitter and cold about humanity. She wants to travel with the Doctor, but he refuses which leads to her making a terrible deal with another alien, Leandro. In the end she sees that she did wrong and mends the situation just in time.

My thoughts?

If you recall last week, you know that I wasn’t very impressed with the episode. Unfortunately this week wasn’t very different. I definitely liked it and there were some great moments in there, but I just didn’t love it either.

It tried to balance (silly) humour with some more dark and reflective topics and I am just not sure they succeeded, because I didn’t find it all that funny. Leandro was the monster of the week, but definitely didn’t leave much of a mark with me other than he could fit into a Cats musical. And Sam Swift, who played a nice counterpart to the Nightmare and who took the term gallows humour quite literally, could now be another immortal? I don’t like it. And his jokes? There’s nothing wrong with them per se, but somehow they just didn’t fit the tone of the episode for me.
However, I did love the more earnest scenes. I liked getting to see a glimpse of what Ashildr (and yes, I am going to call her that and not Nightmare or Lady Me or anything else) went through in her 800 years on earth. She seemed so hurt and lonely – it’s no wonder she locked her heart away. But something did keep bothering me (besides the fact that I have difficulties acknowledging Maisie Williams as a grown-up). She obviously fell in love and had people she cared about, then why didn’t she ever use the second chip to create a companion for herself? She clearly didn’t want them to die. Then again, I suppose I would understand not wanting to bestow immortality on another poor soul.

I quite liked the ending and Ashildr becoming the Patron Saint of the Doctor’s Leftovers. It was so eerie to see her in the background of the selfie Clara took.  But I think it was time for an episode of the Doctor travelling without Clara (once again, a premonition from last week that was correct. YAY!). He used to do that more often in the past and it seems the showrunners have learned from their mistakes in Season 8. Uh, and there was a mention of Jack Harkness, that can never be wrong!

Next week looks interesting, picking up with the Zygon-topic first introduced on The Day of the Doctor. But what was your opinion on the Woman Who Lived? Love or Loathe?

In the Forest of the Night

As always it’s time for a Doctor Who review on Saturday! This time I’ll be talking about Series 8’s “In the Forest of the Night” and we all know what comes now: Spoilers ahead!

A lot happened this week, but it wasn’t at all like I expected it to be. There was global forestation over night, a solar flare that should’ve destroyed the Earth and some really great Clara/Doctor moments. I should say upfront that while there were some really sweet and amazing scenes in between, this again isn’t one of my favourite episodes. I want to clarify that that doesn’t mean that I didn’t like it at all, I just liked others better. But since I seem to complain a bit too much about Doctor Who as of late, I’m trying to find some good things in there. So, let’s break it down:

  • I actually liked the message: Trees are our friends! But the thing was that they tried to sell me that I was supposed to be scared in forests, because of fairy tales and such, but I actually quite like them. Never felt uneasy there, but rather calm instead. What I am scared of though, is getting lost, which seemed like a real possibility during the episode. Also, it would have been way different if it all had played during the night. Everything can be scarier in the night and I will admit that I wouldn’t want to be alone in a forest in the dark.
  • There was some speculation that the episode might have something to do with William Blake‘s poem “The Tyger“, so I’m really glad that there was an actual tiger and that it made sense that he could be there. Cool reference in my opinion!
  • The kids were all great little actors and actresses! Often I’m a little anxious about episodes with loads of children, because they are often not very convincing, but the casting director of Doctor Who either has a ton of luck or chooses really well (I’m guessing a bit more of the latter). Abigail Eames, who played Maebh, did a great job portraying that seemingly troubled little girl and it was creepy when her voice mixed with the one of the “firesflies” (or “trees” whatever I’m supposed to call them).
  • If you’ve followed my blog the past weeks, you probably noticed that I am huge fan of BBC’s Our Girl. The woman who played Maebh’s mother, Siwan Morris, starred as Mrs Smurf/Smith/Candy on that show as well. Just seeing her in another storyline that involves losing a child made the story so much more emotional for me, just because the wounds of Our Girl are still so fresh.
  • I still wonder where Annabel, Maebh’s sister, was and why she ran away … assuming that she left home willingly.
  • I sort of doubt Danny‘s intelligence if he seriously believed that Clara didn’t meet up with the Doctor. He’s a great man, as this episode proved once more, but I just can’t imagine him not noticing that his girlfriend was spending time on the TARDIS, especially not after last week. Also, I just want him to tag along for an adventure and he seems so utterly unwilling to do that, that I’m starting to get tired of him. He has his reasons, and good ones too to be fair, but … I thought this might become more of a Rory-Amy-Doctor dynamic with a twist over time and that’s just highly unlikely now.
  • Twelve and kids is such a fun combination. I like it when they let him play the grumpy Scottish man!
  • Another glimpse of Missy that I could do absolutely nothing with. So glad next week will start to unveil what’s been going on!
  • I loved the scene when Clara told the Doctor to leave without them (although I am not sure if, at that moment, it really was wise to say that they should all die instead of saving at least a few people). Capaldi and Coleman just have this great chemistry and also conflicts with each other, most of the time their confrontations are my favourite part of the episode.

I guess that’s it for today. Concerning “Dark Water” next week … I’m scared to be honest, and not because the Cybermen will make their return. It’s the first part of the finale and I am always anxious about those, because I hate endings, but also because of what I saw in the promo. That just wasn’t like Clara at all and I’m going to freak if nothing was real!

What are your thoughts about “In the Forest of the Night“?

To Kill the Moon, or to Not Kill the Moon?

Kill the Moon was a really tough episode for me. So many emotions and so much to consider … here’s the weekly review of Doctor Who‘s episode. Beware of Spoilers!

I am still not entirely sure what I expected from the episode after the promo, but it definitely wasn’t this. Basically, the Doctor doesn’t want to tell Courtney that she is special, so he takes her and Clara to the moon to make her special. Arriving on site, they find out that the moon is actually an egg and that whatever was growing inside is hatching now and may or may not destroy the earth and humankind. Now, you’d think the Doctor would come to save the day, but no – he disappears and let’s Clara make the decision. That’s what’s happened and here are my thoughts about it:

  • I thought the episode was very gripping from start to finish! As I mentioned, I didn’t really know what to expect and the episode did surprise me on some parts.
  • I hate spiders and those germ-thingies very much looked like spiders to me! They were gross and creepy, so I liked them without ever fully grasping their purpose.
  • Courtney is a really, really lucky girl! Seriously, she got to come back? How awesome would it be to be her right now? She’s also a great comic relief sometimes (e.g. the Tumblr stuff had me cracking up!), but I don’t need her in every episode.
  • Doctor, oh Doctor …  I don’t know what to think about you … I can’t believe he just left Clara to make this decision. He very often seems so indifferent now and I am not sure I like that about his new personality. Yes, he sometimes wants to make us humans think about what to do and how to find the right way on going about things when we deal with something alien (just look at The Day of the Doctor or The Hungry Earth/Cold Blood), but did he really have to abandon her like that? I understand her anger and frustration with him, however, their fight at the end broke my heart.
  • At the beginning I thought it was really weird that it had no consequences whatsoever that the moon wasn’t there anymore, but they resolved that nicely with the “dragon” that hatched laying another egg.
  • There was no sign of Missy and Paradise this week. I’m a little disappointed …
  • Finally something very marginal, but something I nonetheless keep thinking about. I wonder why Danny‘s day was so bad. The answer is probably perfectly normal, but with him I always think that there could be more to it. Still loving him together with Clara.

Overall, I enjoyed this episode very much. Next week, I think we might finally get an episode that is not centered around Clara. There might not even be a Clara in it. Not that I don’t like her, I love her (online personality quizzes told me several times that she is the companion I am most alike, so there is no other way than loving her for me)! Nonetheless, all throughout this season I thought Capaldi could really use an episode where the spotlight is solely on him. What do you think?